Lindblad Expeditions / National Geographic
EXPLORATIONS – A Lindblad Expeditions Blog

Photography

The 10 Best Drone Gifts for Christmas 2014

By Kike Calvo, Photographer and National Geographic Expert

Shopping for a “drone-obsessed” friend or family member? Christmas is almost upon us, and I have decided to think of a general guide to choose a gift that will make happy anyone interested in cool gadgets, quadcopters and Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Catch them off guard with gifts that will put a smile on their faces. I recommend you to read my Drones and Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Series before buying any aerial platforms.

1. ($$$) DJI Inspire 1: A complete ready-to-fly system, the Inspire 1 is complete ready-to-fly system. Carbon fiber arms give you the strength to maneuver in the air and they transform, moving out of the camera’s way at the flick of a switch. With a full 360⁰ unobstructed view, you now have the freedom to capture shots independent of the direction you are flying. Learn more about the DJI Inspire 1.

 

 

DJI Inspire 1

2. ($$$) For the Unfettered Adventurer: DSLRPros Expedition Series P2 Aerial Kit has been specially designed for artists and thrill seekers who refuse to have their creativity limited. The bullet modified motors and ESCs make repairs and replacements easy to perform while on the go. Experience super long range video reception tested up to 1.2 miles with the new DSLRPros video Rx Antenna. The included Travel Backpack comfortably fits all that you need to take your aerial kit to the remote locations you never thought possible. You can also consider buying a DJI Phantom or a DJI Phantom 2 Vision+ Quadcopter if your budget is limited.

BUY: DSLRPros Expedition Series P2 Aerial Kit

3. ($$) Automatic Mission Planning: Powered by 3DR’s world famous autopilot, the new 3d Robotics Iris+ Multicopter is a robot that will automatically fly itself where you tell it to go, while keeping a camera dead steady with two-axis gimbal stabilization. Using the free DroidPlanner app, IRIS+ users can plan flights by simply drawing a flight plan on any Android tablet or phone. Check the Iris+ Multicopter now.

BUY: 3d Robotics Iris+ Multicopter 915 Mhz 3DR IRIS+

4. ($$) Fat Shark Predator V2 FPV RTF Headset System Video Goggle GLASS CAMERA: Experience your radio-controlled vehicle from the pilot’s view point. Commonly it is used to pilot an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), an onboard camera, fed wirelessly to video goggles or a video monitor.

BUY: Fat Shark FATSHARK Predator V2 FPV RTF Headset System Video Goggle GLASS CAMERA

5. ($$) Jumping Sumo with FPV: The Parrot MiniDrone Jumping Sum jumps over 2.5 feet high and always falls back on its wheels. Its equipped with a wide angle camera that streams live immersive views on the piloting screen. I am sure the Parrot MiniDrone Jumping Sumo will bring lots of fun to your home.

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BUY: Parrot MiniDrone Jumping Sumo

6. ($$) Backpack Bag for your Phantom: With Extremely light weight, this Backpack Bag fits the DJI Phantom 1, DJI Phantom 2 Vision, DJI Phantom 2 Vision+, DJI Phantom 2 + Gimbal or DJI Phantom FC40, Fits Extra Accessories GoPro Cameras and Laptop. You can also check other backpacks available in the market.

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BUY: Backpack Bag for DJI Phantom (fits all models) / Check all models

7. ($$) Pebble Smartwatch for iPhone and Android: Hands-free aerial camera control is now a reality. Using a device with a built-in GPS and OTG (on the go) technology and a DroidPlanner app, the new 3d Robotics Iris+ will follow our Pebble Smartwatch for iPhone and Android (Black). DroidPlanner will work with all these devices.

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BUY: Pebble Smartwatch for iPhone and Android (Black)

8. ($) A Tripod for FPV Pilots: The Manfrotto Compact Tripod is perfect to support small monitors for those who enjoy First Person View flying.

BUY: Manfrotto Compact Tripod

9. ($) The Hubsan X4, an Old Time Favorite: Along with the Parrot AR.Drone 2.0 Quadricopter, this 4 Channel 2.4GHz RC Quadcopter helped me polished my flying skills on my early beginnings. Need some skills? Get a Hubsan X4 today.

BUY: Hubsan X4 / Parrot AR.Drone 2.0

10. ($) Buy a Book: As Maurice Sendak once said, “There’s so much more to a book than just the reading.” Here are some suggestions or just check my Cool Stuff List for Drone and Unmanned Vehicle enthusiasts.

Drone / UAV Dictionary: Includes 300 Commercial UAV Applications

Cool stuff for Drone and Unmanned Vehicle enthusiasts

Drone Entrepreneurship: 30 Businesses You Can Start

Small Unmanned Aircraft: Theory and Practice

Drone University

The beginner’s guide to Fpv (B&W)

GoPro Cameras For Dummies

Drones For Dummies (For Dummies (Computer/Tech))

10+1. ($) Kike Calvo’s Drone Gifts:

Inspired by my passion for flying sUAV, I have developed a product collection, that include baseball hats, mugs, mouse pads, key chains, T-Shirts and many other items that will make your loved ones smile.

9 Tips For Better Expedition Photos

By Cristina Veresan, Grosvenor Teacher Fellow & Middle School Science Teacher at Star of the Sea School in Honolulu, Hawaii.

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Whenever I open up an issue of National Geographic magazine, I immediately flip though the pages to preview the photographs. Though I later return to each article to read the text, the images are most powerful in telling the stories. One of the most exciting aspects of the Grosvenor Teacher Fellowship is the opportunity to learn from the expert photographers associated with National Geographic.

I am a totally inexperienced photographer myself and, armed with a hand-me-down Canon Power Shot, was determined to gain some skills. At our pre-voyage workshop in April, naturalists and Lindblad Expeditions-National Geographic-certified photo instructors Michael S. Nolan and CT Ticknor presented a session on expedition photography that was very inspiring. I was fortunate enough to have both Michael and CT on my Lindblad-National Geographic expedition through Svalbard, where I continued my learning. They both have the technical skill to help the most sophisticated photographers but also the heart to help novices like me.

These following expedition photography tips are not my own and must be credited to Michael and CT. However, I will provide my interpretation and examples of my own photos taken on the expedition. Still daunted by settings and white balance, I shot in Auto mode but I did try and pay attention to composition and create images that would help me tell a story.

1. Take an establishing shot.
Each landing we made, I tried to take a photo that broadly captured a sense of place—usually with the ship in the background. The establishing shot provided useful context for the other photos. This is a shot of the beautiful isthmus at our last landing. The white sky and muted colors were otherworldly.
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2. Leave space in the frame.
With the polar bears, it was temping just to zoom in and bulls-eye the animal in every frame. However, when I pulled back and left some space, I got powerful images of the bear in its vast landscape of pack ice.
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3. Rule of thirds.
When shooting landscapes, think of the frame as divided in horizontal thirds and group elements by thirds instead of halves. So, in this shot of water and sky, instead of half water and half ice, I aimed for two-thirds water and one-third sky.
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4. Light sets the mood.
Both the midnight sun and the silvery light in the high latitudes were like nothing I have ever seen. I looked for reflections and shadows. I tried to get up at different times, like this shot at 2 a.m., to capture the mood.
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5. Get in close.
Though I did not have a powerful zoom lens, I did try and get in close where I could. One of the ways I could reasonably do this was by taking macro shots of the vegetation. I often lay down on the spongy tundra to get at ground level. Another way was to zoom in on a glacier face to capture the ice texture.
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6. Use continuous shot to capture action.
Get to know your continuous shot setting! When capturing action, it is a great way to ensure you don’t miss the look of the arctic fox, the take-off of the guillemot, or in this case, the yawn of the polar bear!
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7. Consider the angle of your shot.
I tried to get the ship itself and other guests in some of my shots not only for scale and to establish the scene but to find new angles. During a visit by a curious polar bear, I went up a deck to get this shot.
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8. Layer your images.
I would often hear CT remind us of this when we were on hikes ashore. One easy way to accomplish this is to place something dominant in the foreground with an interesting background like this whale vertebra with hikers and the ship behind it.
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9. Get a sense of scale.
It can be much more powerful to know how big or how small a subject. After photographing tiny vegetation for several days, it finally occurred to me to occasionally put my finger in the shot for scale! Another example: I took a lot of shots of the bird cliff but this one with the Zodiac in it offers scale.
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10. “Don’t Point and Shoot — Aim and Create”
This is a motto that Michael and CT shared at our April meeting that resonated for me while on my expedition. I did not want to come back having snapped thousands of pictures but not really capturing the landscape, the wildlife, and my shipmates in a creative way. I am definitely more mindful of how to aim and create interesting images that tell a story. I am inspired to continue my own journey with photography. And one of these days, with a successful Arctic expedition behind me, I might even venture out of Auto mode.
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Sunrise on South Georgia Island

Yesterday’s dawn found our guests aboard National Geographic Explorer landing at St. Andrew’s Bay on South Georgia Island. Our Director of Expedition Photography Ralph Lee Hopkins sent back this shot of a welcoming committee of king penguins greeting our guests. Right now, Explorer is landing at South Orkney Island, an impromptu stop taking advantage of conditions. If South Georgia Island is on your list, we’ll be returning March 2014—and there are still cabins available.

One Picture: Baja California at Sunrise

by Ralph Lee Hopkins, Director of Expedition Photography

Canon 5D MkIII, 16-35mm @ f/22, 2 seconds, SinghRay 2-stop Soft-step Grad ND, Induro Tripod and Ballhead

For everyone who attended this year’s Baja Land & Sea Photo Retreat they will never forget the sunrise along the wild shores of the Sea of Cortez. Even those that slept through it heard about it. It had all the potential of just another cliché sunrise. But with each passing moment it became more and more unreal, until it was over the top.

My eye was drawn to the reflections on the wet rocks and motion of the surf. I set up my tripod as close to the rocks that I dared. The sturdy Induro tripod and ballhead made it easy to stabilize the camera in a tenuous situation. I’m after foreground that adds a sense of place, depth, or drama to the image. Sometimes the motion is too much, the water lost in the cotton-candy look. Other times not enough, looking stiff and streaky. To get it just right takes practice and experimentation. Even then it’s in the eye of the beholder.

I shot through a sequence of exposures varying my f/stops from f/2.8 to f/22 to alter the depth-of-field, changing ISO to control shutter speeds between 1/4 and 2 seconds, with a neutral-density filter used to hold back the intense sky. Sometimes we get seduced by the filters when software might achieve a better result, so always shoot with and without filters so you can make the choice later.

The high-ISO capability of the Canon 5D MKIII is superb. I always use the lowest ISO possible for the desired result, but I don’t hesitate cranking it up to 1600 ISO, if that what it takes to get the shot. The RAW image was processed in Lightroom for color balance and saturation, which was held back because of the naturally intense colors. Noise reduction was applied to the final image. The selected frame had the best reflections combined with the velvety motion of the water.

What I love about nature photography is that it forces you to be in the moment out in the wilds – to be mindful enough to wait for the light, fine-tune the composition, and anticipate the action. The magic is when it all comes together in the viewfinder, then “click.” We filled our memory cards with memories that will last forever…

Click here for information about the January 11-18, 2014 Baja Land & Sea Photo Retreat with Flip NIcklin and our friends from B&H Photo.

Explorations Cover: Circle of Love

The cover photo of our fall Explorations brochure was shot by Jill Wharton, who won the Orion Expeditions (now Lindblad Expeditions) 2013 photo contest. Jill shot the photo of a mother orangutan who had fashioned an umbrella of leaves to protect her head and her child’s head from the sun at Camp Leakey in Borneo. We’ll return to Camp Leakey aboard National Geographic Orion in 2014 on our new Wild Encounters: Borneo to Bali expedition.

The Last Paradise

A Dispatch from the Galápagos Islands
by Ralph Lee Hopkins, Director of Expedition Photography at Lindblad Expedition-National Geographic

Here in the new Galápagos airport on Baltra Island I’m reminded just how remote the Galápagos Islands really are. I’m returning from a series of photography expeditions with Lindblad Expeditions on board the National Geographic Endeavour. Even in this modern age it takes time and effort to travel this far off the beaten path—a pilgrimage to one of the last places on Earth that is totally wild and pristine.

Straddling the Equator, it’s hard to imagine a place on earth with a higher percentage of endemic species, including the famous Darwin’s finches, playful Galápagos sea lions, and the world’s only marine iguanas. What separates the Galápagos Islands from other places in the world is that 97% of the land is protected within the Galápagos Island National Park, and the islands are surrounded by one of the largest and most successful marine protected areas in the world. My hope is that it will always be this way.

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Shooting National Geographic Explorer in Greenland’s Ice

Our Director of Expedition Photography, Ralph Lee Hopkins gets the “doors off” shot of National Geographic Explorer navigating through Greenland’s ice. He was joined aboard the hired helicopter by video chronicler Jim Napoli as they flew over Disko Bay and got the shots among the towering icebergs.

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Travel & Photography: The Gear of Choice, National Geographic Photographer Ralph Lee Hopkins

Ralph Lee Hopkins is a National Geographic photographer and the Lindblad Expeditions-National Geographic director of Expedition Photography. He filed this post, originally on the B&H Photo Video blog, giving us a look at his gear of choice for shooting on expedition.

Every travel photographer has a bucket list of dream destinations. There are a number of wild places in the world that are best visited by ocean-going expeditions on small passenger ships, and you don’t have to go half way around the world to find world-class photo opportunities. Among my favorite destinations that combine spectacular scenery with abundant wildlife are Southeast Alaska, Baja California (Mexico), and the Galápagos Islands (Ecuador).

The best thing about traveling by ship is that you unpack for the duration of the voyage, so there’s no packing and re-packing. It’s a relaxing way to travel, as the ship takes you to new places every day. The ship serves as a platform for photography, and it’s high adventure getting out on the water and photographing wildlife and seascapes from inflatable Zodiacs.

Another great thing about ship-based travel is that you typically can bring the arsenal, unlike traveling in Africa, for example, where weight is critical when flying in small planes between camps. But you will still want to check the travel guidelines for connecting flights, pack efficiently, and bring only what is essential.

For more than 20 years I’ve been traveling the world with Lindblad Expeditions and National Geographic. It’s amazing how the way I travel has changed with the advent of the digital world of photography. Below is a discussion of my gear for ship-based expeditions.

Stellar sea lions, South Marble Islands, Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, Southeast Alaska. Making sharp images from a moving ship requires shooting with a fast shutter speed and being prepared to capture the moment. It had been raining all day in Glacier Bay when the weather finally broke. The soft side light highlighted the steam coming off the animals. (Canon DSLR, 100-400mm, f/5.6 @ 1/1000, ISO 400)

Getting There

If there’s one rule of thumb for travel photographers, it’s to be sure to carry all your essential gear with you on the plane—from cameras bodies, lenses, and battery chargers to laptop computer and back-up hard drives. This way, if your luggage is lost or delayed, you still have the essential gear for making photographs. There are many camera bags on the market and I’ve tried just about all of them. For negotiating airports and getting to the port of embarkation, the best way to go is with wheels. My current favorite is the Tamrac SpeedRoller 5551, which has adjustable interior compartments and fits easily in the overhead of most commercial jets. My second carry-on bag is a Think Tank Urban Disguise 60 V2.0 shoulder bag that slips over the handle of the rolling bag. These two bags carry all my essential gear—a good thing since I spent 3 weeks recently on a Peruvian Upper Amazon voyage without my checked luggage, so don’t forget to also include a change of light-weight travel clothes in your carry-on bags.

Common dolphins in the Sea of Cortez, Baja California, Mexico. Panning with a moving subject at slow shutter speeds captures a sense of motion. In low-light situations it’s possible to create artistic images at speeds of 1/15 to 1/30 second with your camera set to Shutter Priority. For best results, also set your camera to burst mode and continuous focus, firing off a series of short bursts. (Canon DSLR, 70-200mm, f/10 @ 1/15,  ISO 100])

Protecting your Gear

Ship-based travel involves being around water, so it’s also crucial to have a good camera beltpack or backpack, complete with a rain cover. Depending on the destination and the situation, I use two different systems—a GuraGear Kiboko 22L Backpack or a Tamrac 5769 Velocity 9x Sling Pack. The backpack handles two camera bodies and long lenses while the sling pack is for more mobile situations, but can also handle two bodies with shorter zooms attached. Both these bags are packed in my checked luggage, stuffed with clothes and extra equipment. For the more adventure travel destinations, like Antarctica or the high Arctic where wet landings are the norm, I’ll travel with a hard-sided Pelican 1514 Carry-On 1510 Case with padded dividers that is completely waterproof. Once I get to the ship, I reconfigure my gear from the rolling bag to one of these more mobile setups. It’s important to be prepared for shooting in stormy conditions, as there can be some great light and photo opportunities, so each camera bag has a couple of OP/TECH Rainsleeves, which I modify withAquaTech eye pieces on my digital SLRs. For more serious wet destinations, like Southeast Alaska, I’ll also use the AquaTech SS-200 Sport Shield Rain Cover, which is more durable and user friendly.

Do I Really Need my Tripod? 

This is the number-one question for travel photographers. Even in the digital age of high-ISO shooting, a tripod is essential for shooting with long lenses and at slow shutter speeds. The most important consideration for travel photographers is size and weight. My current tripod of choice is the Oben CT-3510 5-section folding tripod, which weighs slightly less than 3 lb and folds to about 15 inches. For ease of use I’ll pair this with a Really Right Stuff BH-30 Small Ball Head and quick-release plates. For certain situations, like using the big guns shooting bald eagles in Alaska, I’ll use a more heavy-weight Induro Carbon 8X CT314 Tripod paired with an Induro GHB2 Gimbal Head. I also travel with an Induro monopod for shooting from the deck of the ship and a Bucky travel pillow as a beanbag for working from the rail—also great for comfort on the plane.

Courtship dance, blue-footed boobies, Galápagos Islands, Ecuador. The animals of the Galapagos show no fear, making this a dream destination for travel photographers interested in nature and exotic wildlife. But even though you can get close to the animals, it takes extra effort to get the shot. Getting down at eye level, then zooming in to create shallow depth of field will help isolate the animals from distracting backgrounds.
(Canon DSLR, 70-200mm w/1.4x converter, f/8 @ 1/640,  ISO 400)

Camera System

In the digital world, it’s important to keep up with the latest advances in technology. The number-one reason for upgrading is for the low noise at high ISOs, since it’s not uncommon to shoot at 400 ISO and above when working from a moving platform like the ship or a Zodiac. My workhorse camera bodies are the Canon EOS 5D Mark III and the Canon EOS 1D X. Both cameras have full-frame sensors and very low noise. The 5D is primarily for landscapes and situations where I don’t need the 10 frames per second of the 1D X, which is my go-to camera for wildlife and action. I also carry a Canon Powershot G15 for grab shots, its excellent macro capabilities, and for its inexpensive underwater housing for snorkeling and shooting in the surf. Zoom lenses are the way to go for travel photography. My arsenal includes the 16-35mm24-105mm, and 70-300mm. Although I’ve generally switched from the heavier f/2.8 and fixed focal length telephoto lenses, I must say that I’m looking forward to the new Canon 200-400mm zoom with the built in 1.4x teleconverter.

Other Important Stuff

There are a few other items that I don’t leave home without, like knee pads for getting down and dirty, and I find the Black Rapid Camera Shoulder Straps to be a comfortable alternative to standard camera straps. And the Luminair Full-Time Intelli-Charger has saved me when my dedicated chargers have failed.

 

Doors Off Over Baja California

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Aerial Photo Expedition from Land’s End to San Diego
By Ralph Lee Hopkins, Lindblad Expeditions-National Geographic Director of Expedition Photography

Although we landed in San Diego a week ago, I still have not come down from the adventure of flying over Baja California during the first photo expedition of the
Baja Aerial Archive Project with LightHawk, WiLDCOAST, and iLCP.

This was not your normal flight-seeing operation, but an adventure full of uncertainty, military checkpoints, dirt airstrips, and, fortunately, an awful lot of good luck.

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LightHawk’s battle-tested Cessna 206 is the perfect high-wing aircraft for aerial photography, especially flying with both cargo doors off. With nothing between me and the earth 1500′ below, I had the best seat in the house. For safety, I was strapped in a harness designed by the US CoastGuard, and also a seatbelt.

The most difficult part was avoiding sensory overload. Every takeoff and landing was an adrenaline rush for sure, but once in the air at our exploring altitude, it was total bliss being in the moment with camera in hand as one incredible scene merged into another.

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And we didn’t fly in straight lines either — covering over 3,500 nautical miles or 3.5 times the length of the Baja Peninsula in just 9 days.

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Since tracking the location of the images was of critical concern, B&H Photo outfitted me with a Canon 1DX and GPS receiver, so that all of the 13,000+ images shot on the expedition are properly geo-tagged with lat/long co-ordinates. My workhorse lens was the Canon 24-105mm zoom, paired with the Canon 70-300mm zoom. Singhray ND grads and a polarizing filter helped narrow the exposure values between the bright landscapes and dark water. The camera was mounted on a Ken-Lab gyro-stabilizer to help minimize vibration, permitting me to work at shutter-speeds down to 1/500 sec. at ISO 800-1600 between f/4-f/8.

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We had the best pilot for the mission Colonel Will Worthigton, a volunteer pilot and board member with LightHawk, and also a retired civil engineer with the US Army Corps. We also had the best operations manager, spotter and chief negotiator/diplomat, Armando Ubeda, Program Director for LighHawk. And teaming with me for video is filmmaker/photographer, Jeff Litton, a virtual energizer bunny always shooting while being squeezed into the tightest seat.

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It was a photographer’s dream working with “the Colonel.” His plane-handling skills, together with his great appreciation for desert landscapes and understanding of coastal processes, helped us be in the right spot at the right time, flying not only for the best light, but also for the best composition. We worked well together, sometimes circling 2 or 3 times to get the best angle. At one point, we circled 700 feet above two humpback whales that breached repeatedly for 18 minutes.

Connecting the dots from our zig-zag itinerary, we flew from the over-developed tourist sector of Cabo San Lucas, to the noisy, motorized playground of San Felipe, then across to the Pacific Coast at San Quintin, skirting Picacho del Diablo, Baja’s highest point rising 10,000 feet above the sea in Sierra San Pedro Martir National Park. We flew almost the entire length of the mountainous coastline along the Sea of Cortez, the entire length of Magdalena Bay and the Sierra de la Giganta, circled over 500,000 nesting seabirds on Isla Rasa, and along the west side of Isla Ángel de la Guarda.

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The Colonel was right when he remarked, after landing in San Diego, “If I hadn’t insisted we get back on course, we’d still be circling the blue whales off Punta Colonet.”

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In between photo opportunities, there was plenty of time to ponder the amazing world we were flying over.

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What impressed me the most was how much of Baja remains wild, with its vast expanses of desert wilderness, jagged mountain ranges, and endless coastlines. The Baja peninsula is where the desert meets the sea, a young landscape pulling away from mainland Mexico by the same plate tectonic forces that creates earthquakes in California, USA. In between the madness of Southern California and Cabo San Lucas remains one of the world’s last great treasures, not unlike the Galapagos Islands, with many endemic species unique to Baja and the islands along its shores.

On the flip side, what also impressed me is the huge impact large-scale, mega-developments has on Baja’s coastline, with marinas being carved into wetlands, golf courses being watered in the desert, and high-rise hotels blocking the waterfront and limiting public access to the best beaches.

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From the air I also learned how dynamic the coastline is with the barrier islands and beaches shifting with the seasons, and when breached, how coastal processes cause severe erosion, significantly altering the beach profile, while destroying nesting habitat for endangered sea turtles that come ashore to lay their eggs.

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And I could also see from the air how fragile the coastal wetlands, estuaries, and lagoons are, not only the obvious impacts along the coastal zone, but also disturbances in the headwaters of the watershed, often hidden out of view from the ground.

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But what I will remember most is what an honor it was to ask, “Colonel, Sir, any chance you can raise the wing just one more time? Thank you, Sir.”

Explore Baja California yourself on a Lindblad-National Geographic expedition.

Polar Bear Catches Beluga Whale

Guests aboard National Geographic Explorer in Arctic Svalbard enjoyed a rare sighting yesterday: a polar bear feasting on a beluga whale. How did this bear manage to catch a whale nearly twice its weight? Perhaps the whale was killed by ice calving off the glacier, though the bear would still have to drag the dead beluga onto the ice—no small task. In any case, it is impossible to know since we arrived just in time to see the bear over its kill. It is indeed a rare sighting; in our 30+ years exploring Svalbard only one of our naturalists has ever seen a polar bear feasting on a beluga whale.