Lindblad Expeditions / National Geographic
EXPLORATIONS – A Lindblad Expeditions Blog

Video

Orcas Attack Juvenile Sperm Whale

Photographers off the coast of Sri Lanka managed to capture underwater footage of a rare encounter when a pod of orcas attacked a sperm whale. Fewer than a dozen of these types of predation have been observed, though some of our guests are among the lucky few to have seen it. During an expedition in Baja California’s Sea of Cortez, we observed orcas attack a juvenile sperm whale. The orcas were chased off when a large male returned to the group and sped into the fray. Our video chronicler shot a video expedition report on the event, but without underwater footage, you can largely only see the roily waters.



Shawn Heinrichs, the photographer in Sri Lanka, took the bold step of suiting up to dive with the orcas attacking the sperm whale. As no humans have ever observed this kind of behavior up close, he was relying mostly on faith for his safety.

Farming in the Galápagos Islands

Spend a day with our guests on Santa Cruz Island in Galápagos and see not just the strange and beautiful wildlife, but the way some residents choose to make a live: sustainable farming in the highlands. We visit a farm that produces sugar cane in the old-fashioned method, plus shade-grown coffee, and a Galápagos liquor made from fermented and distilled sugar cane juice.

Video the Adventure: Workshops to be Held Aboard National Geographic Explorer

 

This year National Geographic photographer filmmakers Cotton Coulson and David Wright will be conducting video workshops aboard National Geographic Explorer during our Epic South America expedition and the Nov 7, 2013 Antarctica, South Georgia & The Falklands expedition.

They’ve created a series of gear-up videos to helps guests get a head start on preparing to shoot and produce their own nature documentaries, you can find them on Cotton Coulson’s Vimeo page. And you’ll find tutorials, tips, and equipment reviews on their new website, Expedition Workshops.

The Largest Glacial Calving Event Ever Filmed

 

National Geographic photographer and filmmaker James Balog has recently been on NPR, given a TED talk, and spoken to several news outlets about his film Chasing Ice. Last month he joined us aboard National Geographic Explorer in Antarctica, where we screened his film and he spoke with guests. And this summer, though Balog won’t be aboard, Explorer will venture to Ilulissat glacier—where his crew filmed the largest glacial calving event ever recorded.

There is limited space aboard to join us on the expedition, Fabled Lands of the North: Greenland, Baffin Island, Newfoundland & Labrador.

Ethnomusicologist Jacob Edgar Profiled in Afar Magazine

 

The host of the PBS travel series Music Voyager and founder of the record label Cumbancha, Jacob Edgar was profiled in the latest Afar magazine. Jacob travels the globe, seeking out unique, moving music to sign to his label and share with the world. Last year he traveled up the entire coast of West Africa with us aboard National Geographic Explorer, visiting the dazzling markets of the coastal cities always on the hunt for the new, intriguing music. Our video chronicler joined him as he visited the market in Dakar to see what locals were listening to, buying, and selling.

And next year, Jacob will join us again aboard National Geographic Explorer lending his unique expertise to our guests on two epic voyages: Exploring Africa’s West Coast in March, and again on our Epic South America expedition in September 2013.

Take a Bike Ride Through Visby

On a wind-whipped day in Visby, Sweden our guests aboard National Geographic Explorer took a bike ride outside of the city, through the woods, and along the coast to the sheer limestone cliffs looking out along the west side of Gotland. The cultural expedition visits all nine countries that boarder the Baltic Sea. And next year’s expedition among all countries bordering the Baltic Sea will prove to be even more epic in scope. A single departure, it is a circumnavigation over 16 days.

Google Maps Adds Reefs, Sea Life & Undersea Imagery

Get a glimpse of the undersea without leaving your desk. A new addition to Google Maps lets you explore stunning panoramics of six reef ecosystems in Australia, the Philippines, and Hawaii.

Google Maps Street View has long allowed users to zoom down to street-level to see close-ups of city storefronts and suburban homes. The images are shot by car-mounted cameras that Google employees have driven over millions of miles of roads across the U.S.  Together with The Catlin Seaview Survey, Google developed an undersea Street View camera capable of offering an intimate look at these ecosystems—as if one’s swimming above and among them while snorkeling or Scuba diving.

While this is the first time undersea images have been made available on Google Maps, it’s not the first time Google has let us glimpse beneath the sea. A couple years ago they added an Ocean layer to Google Earth. That project was spearheaded by National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Sylvia Earle, and created using many photos and videos from Lindblad Expeditions-National Geographic.

Google Maps ‘Reef View’ offers an easy way for armchair adventurers to explore the planet’s beautiful, remote places. And hopefully as more people see these delicate reefs, more of them will advocate for their preservation and protection.

Amazing Film: Huge Aggregations of Mobula Rays

Last April in Baja California our guests spotted huge aggregations of these mobula rays in the Sea of Cortez. On a bright, sunny, calm day we were able to see deep into the water. For each ray that leapt into the air hundreds more circled below feeding. This excellent BBC footage captures a bit of the same phenomenon.

Watch an Iceberg Collapse in Antarctica

A crewmember on the Sea Shepherd in Antarctica captured this unusual sequence of images a couple years ago. “I literally raised my camera to my eye (Canon 1D Mark II w/70-200/2.8L lens), and the arch collapsed. I mashed the shutter button down and captured 20 frames—in bursts. I shot in bursts because I was afraid that the buffer wouldn’t hold.” He put it together those shots in this 9-second clip of the iceberg arch’s collapse. Antarctica is the world’s last great wilderness—come see it for yourself.

This is Our Planet

Take a trip into low Earth orbit for a unique look at home. Filmmaker Tomislav Safundžić cut together this edit of Earth as seen from the International Space Station.

NASA also recently released this image of the top of the world, that includes the entire high Arctic region. It’s compiled from 15 satellite passes of a spacecraft that circled earth pole-to-pole in May and offers a look from a seldom-seen vantage point.