Lindblad Expeditions / National Geographic
EXPLORATIONS – A Lindblad Expeditions Blog

Google Science Fair Grand Prize Winner in Galápagos



Seventeen-year-old Brittany Wenger designed an application that helps accurately diagnose breast cancer through a minimally invasive procedure. Her program filters massive amounts of data to detect complex patterns, and it turned one of the least precise diagnostic tools available to doctors into one that’s 99% accurate. For her feat of science she was awarded, among other prizes, a Galápagos expedition aboard National Geographic Endeavour, where she shot this video.

The Great White Shark: Blue Water, White Death

 

In 1971 the documentary film Blue Water, White Death introduced thousands to the great white shark and famously inspired the film Jaws. Once feared, and still considered a fearsome predator, great whites are now often the subject of ocean conservation. Last year the fantastic film Blue Water, White Death was re-released, and it does just as fantastic a job sharing the story of these incredible creatures.

One of the stars of the film is diver and filmmaker Valerie Taylor. She will join us aboard National Geographic Orion on the ship’s inaugural expedition, Exploring Papua New Guinea, Vanuatu, The Solomons & The Great Barrier Reef. If you’d like to travel with her, there are still some cabins available.

Killer Whale Research Aboard National Geographic Explorer

Killer whales are instantly recognizable and live in all the world’s oceans, but relatively little is known about their habits in the wild, especially in remote locations such as Antarctica. Scientists Dr. Bob Pitman and Dr. John Durban have been supported by the Lindblad Expeditions-National Geographic (LEX-NG) Fund since 2011, to facilitate their ongoing killer whale research in Antarctica.

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Shooting National Geographic Explorer in Greenland’s Ice

Our Director of Expedition Photography, Ralph Lee Hopkins gets the “doors off” shot of National Geographic Explorer navigating through Greenland’s ice. He was joined aboard the hired helicopter by video chronicler Jim Napoli as they flew over Disko Bay and got the shots among the towering icebergs.

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Bubblenet Feeding: Seeing It Up Close (and Too Close)

 

A video shot by the Central California Coast Divers at Souza Rock shows a couple divers having a rather too-close encounter with some feeding humpback whales. So far over 5 million people have watched it on YouTube (be warned that there’s a bit of unsavory language).

Many of our guests in Alaska have witnessed this whale behavior (from the safety of our expedition ships). It’s called bubblenet feeding—and in the above video one of our guests explains it.

Travel & Photography: The Gear of Choice, National Geographic Photographer Ralph Lee Hopkins

Ralph Lee Hopkins is a National Geographic photographer and the Lindblad Expeditions-National Geographic director of Expedition Photography. He filed this post, originally on the B&H Photo Video blog, giving us a look at his gear of choice for shooting on expedition.

Every travel photographer has a bucket list of dream destinations. There are a number of wild places in the world that are best visited by ocean-going expeditions on small passenger ships, and you don’t have to go half way around the world to find world-class photo opportunities. Among my favorite destinations that combine spectacular scenery with abundant wildlife are Southeast Alaska, Baja California (Mexico), and the Galápagos Islands (Ecuador).

The best thing about traveling by ship is that you unpack for the duration of the voyage, so there’s no packing and re-packing. It’s a relaxing way to travel, as the ship takes you to new places every day. The ship serves as a platform for photography, and it’s high adventure getting out on the water and photographing wildlife and seascapes from inflatable Zodiacs.

Another great thing about ship-based travel is that you typically can bring the arsenal, unlike traveling in Africa, for example, where weight is critical when flying in small planes between camps. But you will still want to check the travel guidelines for connecting flights, pack efficiently, and bring only what is essential.

For more than 20 years I’ve been traveling the world with Lindblad Expeditions and National Geographic. It’s amazing how the way I travel has changed with the advent of the digital world of photography. Below is a discussion of my gear for ship-based expeditions.

Stellar sea lions, South Marble Islands, Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, Southeast Alaska. Making sharp images from a moving ship requires shooting with a fast shutter speed and being prepared to capture the moment. It had been raining all day in Glacier Bay when the weather finally broke. The soft side light highlighted the steam coming off the animals. (Canon DSLR, 100-400mm, f/5.6 @ 1/1000, ISO 400)

Getting There

If there’s one rule of thumb for travel photographers, it’s to be sure to carry all your essential gear with you on the plane—from cameras bodies, lenses, and battery chargers to laptop computer and back-up hard drives. This way, if your luggage is lost or delayed, you still have the essential gear for making photographs. There are many camera bags on the market and I’ve tried just about all of them. For negotiating airports and getting to the port of embarkation, the best way to go is with wheels. My current favorite is the Tamrac SpeedRoller 5551, which has adjustable interior compartments and fits easily in the overhead of most commercial jets. My second carry-on bag is a Think Tank Urban Disguise 60 V2.0 shoulder bag that slips over the handle of the rolling bag. These two bags carry all my essential gear—a good thing since I spent 3 weeks recently on a Peruvian Upper Amazon voyage without my checked luggage, so don’t forget to also include a change of light-weight travel clothes in your carry-on bags.

Common dolphins in the Sea of Cortez, Baja California, Mexico. Panning with a moving subject at slow shutter speeds captures a sense of motion. In low-light situations it’s possible to create artistic images at speeds of 1/15 to 1/30 second with your camera set to Shutter Priority. For best results, also set your camera to burst mode and continuous focus, firing off a series of short bursts. (Canon DSLR, 70-200mm, f/10 @ 1/15,  ISO 100])

Protecting your Gear

Ship-based travel involves being around water, so it’s also crucial to have a good camera beltpack or backpack, complete with a rain cover. Depending on the destination and the situation, I use two different systems—a GuraGear Kiboko 22L Backpack or a Tamrac 5769 Velocity 9x Sling Pack. The backpack handles two camera bodies and long lenses while the sling pack is for more mobile situations, but can also handle two bodies with shorter zooms attached. Both these bags are packed in my checked luggage, stuffed with clothes and extra equipment. For the more adventure travel destinations, like Antarctica or the high Arctic where wet landings are the norm, I’ll travel with a hard-sided Pelican 1514 Carry-On 1510 Case with padded dividers that is completely waterproof. Once I get to the ship, I reconfigure my gear from the rolling bag to one of these more mobile setups. It’s important to be prepared for shooting in stormy conditions, as there can be some great light and photo opportunities, so each camera bag has a couple of OP/TECH Rainsleeves, which I modify withAquaTech eye pieces on my digital SLRs. For more serious wet destinations, like Southeast Alaska, I’ll also use the AquaTech SS-200 Sport Shield Rain Cover, which is more durable and user friendly.

Do I Really Need my Tripod? 

This is the number-one question for travel photographers. Even in the digital age of high-ISO shooting, a tripod is essential for shooting with long lenses and at slow shutter speeds. The most important consideration for travel photographers is size and weight. My current tripod of choice is the Oben CT-3510 5-section folding tripod, which weighs slightly less than 3 lb and folds to about 15 inches. For ease of use I’ll pair this with a Really Right Stuff BH-30 Small Ball Head and quick-release plates. For certain situations, like using the big guns shooting bald eagles in Alaska, I’ll use a more heavy-weight Induro Carbon 8X CT314 Tripod paired with an Induro GHB2 Gimbal Head. I also travel with an Induro monopod for shooting from the deck of the ship and a Bucky travel pillow as a beanbag for working from the rail—also great for comfort on the plane.

Courtship dance, blue-footed boobies, Galápagos Islands, Ecuador. The animals of the Galapagos show no fear, making this a dream destination for travel photographers interested in nature and exotic wildlife. But even though you can get close to the animals, it takes extra effort to get the shot. Getting down at eye level, then zooming in to create shallow depth of field will help isolate the animals from distracting backgrounds.
(Canon DSLR, 70-200mm w/1.4x converter, f/8 @ 1/640,  ISO 400)

Camera System

In the digital world, it’s important to keep up with the latest advances in technology. The number-one reason for upgrading is for the low noise at high ISOs, since it’s not uncommon to shoot at 400 ISO and above when working from a moving platform like the ship or a Zodiac. My workhorse camera bodies are the Canon EOS 5D Mark III and the Canon EOS 1D X. Both cameras have full-frame sensors and very low noise. The 5D is primarily for landscapes and situations where I don’t need the 10 frames per second of the 1D X, which is my go-to camera for wildlife and action. I also carry a Canon Powershot G15 for grab shots, its excellent macro capabilities, and for its inexpensive underwater housing for snorkeling and shooting in the surf. Zoom lenses are the way to go for travel photography. My arsenal includes the 16-35mm24-105mm, and 70-300mm. Although I’ve generally switched from the heavier f/2.8 and fixed focal length telephoto lenses, I must say that I’m looking forward to the new Canon 200-400mm zoom with the built in 1.4x teleconverter.

Other Important Stuff

There are a few other items that I don’t leave home without, like knee pads for getting down and dirty, and I find the Black Rapid Camera Shoulder Straps to be a comfortable alternative to standard camera straps. And the Luminair Full-Time Intelli-Charger has saved me when my dedicated chargers have failed.

 

Emmy Nomination for National Geographic’s Untamed Americas

 

Congratulations to National Geographic photographers and filmmakers David Wright and Cotton Coulson for an Emmy nomination on a series they contributed to, Untamed Americas. The episode they helped shoot featured battling bighorn sheep in Canada’s Jasper National Park, where they waited for hours in -30°F weather to get the footage. The Emmy nomination is for Outstanding Cinematography.

This September we look forward to welcoming David and Cotton aboard National Geographic Explorer for our Epic South America expedition. It will be the first time we offer an unprecedented video workshop—in one of the wildest and most cinematic places on the planet. The in-depth workshop will be limited to 25 guests interested in shooting, editing, and producing their own highly personal documentary film. If you’re interested in attending the on-board workshop contact an expedition specialist to reserve you place. 1.800.EXPEDITION (1.800.397.3348).

Doors Off Over Baja California

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Aerial Photo Expedition from Land’s End to San Diego
By Ralph Lee Hopkins, Lindblad Expeditions-National Geographic Director of Expedition Photography

Although we landed in San Diego a week ago, I still have not come down from the adventure of flying over Baja California during the first photo expedition of the
Baja Aerial Archive Project with LightHawk, WiLDCOAST, and iLCP.

This was not your normal flight-seeing operation, but an adventure full of uncertainty, military checkpoints, dirt airstrips, and, fortunately, an awful lot of good luck.

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LightHawk’s battle-tested Cessna 206 is the perfect high-wing aircraft for aerial photography, especially flying with both cargo doors off. With nothing between me and the earth 1500′ below, I had the best seat in the house. For safety, I was strapped in a harness designed by the US CoastGuard, and also a seatbelt.

The most difficult part was avoiding sensory overload. Every takeoff and landing was an adrenaline rush for sure, but once in the air at our exploring altitude, it was total bliss being in the moment with camera in hand as one incredible scene merged into another.

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And we didn’t fly in straight lines either — covering over 3,500 nautical miles or 3.5 times the length of the Baja Peninsula in just 9 days.

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Since tracking the location of the images was of critical concern, B&H Photo outfitted me with a Canon 1DX and GPS receiver, so that all of the 13,000+ images shot on the expedition are properly geo-tagged with lat/long co-ordinates. My workhorse lens was the Canon 24-105mm zoom, paired with the Canon 70-300mm zoom. Singhray ND grads and a polarizing filter helped narrow the exposure values between the bright landscapes and dark water. The camera was mounted on a Ken-Lab gyro-stabilizer to help minimize vibration, permitting me to work at shutter-speeds down to 1/500 sec. at ISO 800-1600 between f/4-f/8.

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We had the best pilot for the mission Colonel Will Worthigton, a volunteer pilot and board member with LightHawk, and also a retired civil engineer with the US Army Corps. We also had the best operations manager, spotter and chief negotiator/diplomat, Armando Ubeda, Program Director for LighHawk. And teaming with me for video is filmmaker/photographer, Jeff Litton, a virtual energizer bunny always shooting while being squeezed into the tightest seat.

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It was a photographer’s dream working with “the Colonel.” His plane-handling skills, together with his great appreciation for desert landscapes and understanding of coastal processes, helped us be in the right spot at the right time, flying not only for the best light, but also for the best composition. We worked well together, sometimes circling 2 or 3 times to get the best angle. At one point, we circled 700 feet above two humpback whales that breached repeatedly for 18 minutes.

Connecting the dots from our zig-zag itinerary, we flew from the over-developed tourist sector of Cabo San Lucas, to the noisy, motorized playground of San Felipe, then across to the Pacific Coast at San Quintin, skirting Picacho del Diablo, Baja’s highest point rising 10,000 feet above the sea in Sierra San Pedro Martir National Park. We flew almost the entire length of the mountainous coastline along the Sea of Cortez, the entire length of Magdalena Bay and the Sierra de la Giganta, circled over 500,000 nesting seabirds on Isla Rasa, and along the west side of Isla Ángel de la Guarda.

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The Colonel was right when he remarked, after landing in San Diego, “If I hadn’t insisted we get back on course, we’d still be circling the blue whales off Punta Colonet.”

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In between photo opportunities, there was plenty of time to ponder the amazing world we were flying over.

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What impressed me the most was how much of Baja remains wild, with its vast expanses of desert wilderness, jagged mountain ranges, and endless coastlines. The Baja peninsula is where the desert meets the sea, a young landscape pulling away from mainland Mexico by the same plate tectonic forces that creates earthquakes in California, USA. In between the madness of Southern California and Cabo San Lucas remains one of the world’s last great treasures, not unlike the Galapagos Islands, with many endemic species unique to Baja and the islands along its shores.

On the flip side, what also impressed me is the huge impact large-scale, mega-developments has on Baja’s coastline, with marinas being carved into wetlands, golf courses being watered in the desert, and high-rise hotels blocking the waterfront and limiting public access to the best beaches.

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From the air I also learned how dynamic the coastline is with the barrier islands and beaches shifting with the seasons, and when breached, how coastal processes cause severe erosion, significantly altering the beach profile, while destroying nesting habitat for endangered sea turtles that come ashore to lay their eggs.

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And I could also see from the air how fragile the coastal wetlands, estuaries, and lagoons are, not only the obvious impacts along the coastal zone, but also disturbances in the headwaters of the watershed, often hidden out of view from the ground.

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But what I will remember most is what an honor it was to ask, “Colonel, Sir, any chance you can raise the wing just one more time? Thank you, Sir.”

Explore Baja California yourself on a Lindblad-National Geographic expedition.

A Rat? A Rat! (A Rather Rare Rat)

Guests exploring Galápagos aboard National Geographic Islander had a rare encounter last month. While hiking on Santa Fe Island they found a small rat that managed to get its teeth caught in the mesh of a backpack a guest had left sitting on the beach. The tiny animal turned out to be the seldom-seen Santa Fe rice rat, one of the few mammal species endemic to the archipelago. The rat was released back into the wild with a handy bit of pocketknife work.

From the day’s expedition report:

“The Santa Fe rice rat is eminently vegetarian. It is a fearless creature that normally comes out at dusk or at night. This afternoon was a rather gloomy one, therefore some rats were seen. This was a fantastic and unforgettable sighting of one the least known animal species of the archipelago. The picture that Walter Perez took today is the first ever published in our daily expedition reports!”

Polar Bear Catches Beluga Whale

Guests aboard National Geographic Explorer in Arctic Svalbard enjoyed a rare sighting yesterday: a polar bear feasting on a beluga whale. How did this bear manage to catch a whale nearly twice its weight? Perhaps the whale was killed by ice calving off the glacier, though the bear would still have to drag the dead beluga onto the ice—no small task. In any case, it is impossible to know since we arrived just in time to see the bear over its kill. It is indeed a rare sighting; in our 30+ years exploring Svalbard only one of our naturalists has ever seen a polar bear feasting on a beluga whale.