Video

Video Chronicler

The expedition team landed in a quiet cove on the Antarctica peninsula and guests dispersed across the hillside for hikes. Some ascended to the top and, before they could slide their way back down, a loud thunder-like crack shook the ground and everyone watched as a nearby glacier calved a massive chunk of ice into the water sending up an explosion of water and creating a wave that had the ship and Zodiacs bobbing in the bay. 

The video chronicler, standing on this hillside with his camera getting footage of hikers with the ship in the background was the person everyone wanted to talk to. They had one question on their minds: “Did you get it?” 

It’s a question these professional videographers are asked over and over. Guests want to know if they captured the breaching whales, the bow-riding dolphins, the polar bear hunting a seal, or the sharks languidly swimming past. The answer is almost always a resounding, “Yes!”

Video chroniclers accompany every expedition that sails aboard National Geographic-flagged fleet. Lindblad created the role inspired by historic visual chroniclers, like Herbert Ponting and Frank Hurley, who accompanied expeditions during the golden age of Antarctic exploration and created iconic images of the era. 

The video chroniclers shoot vivid HD footage on every expedition and—with no recycled footage ever—they provide guests with a professionally edited and completely authentic memento of their expedition. Guests often compare it to receiving a nature documentary of their expedition—something totally unique to share with friends and family when asked, “How was the trip?”

Guests consistently compliment the quality of the video and marvel at how many moments were caught on film. Plus, with video chroniclers onboard, they find themselves free to relax a bit, knowing a professional is capturing every moment of the expedition allowing them to put down their camera or video camera and be more in the moment.

The expedition team landed in a quiet cove on the Antarctica peninsula and guests dispersed across the hillside for hikes. Some ascended to the top and, before they could slide their way back down, a loud thunder-like crack shook the ground and everyone watched as a nearby glacier calved a massive chunk of ice into the water sending up an explosion of water and creating a wave that had the ship and Zodiacs bobbing in the bay. ...

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Expedition staff are subject to change.