Lindblad Expeditions / National Geographic
EXPLORATIONS – A Lindblad Expeditions Blog

T-25 Days: What Makes Quest Perfect for Alaska?

We’re counting down to the launch of our brand-new expedition ship National Geographic Quest! Follow along from now until June 26 and stay up-to-date on the latest happenings as the big day draws near. Every Thursday see how the Quest features will enhance your expedition experience wherever you journey. Watch below then check back tomorrow to catch a time-lapse video of the past seven days.

What makes the National Geographic Quest the perfect expedition vessel for Alaska?
“There’s just so much to see, and it’s not always on a schedule. With wildlife like humpback whales, sea lions or bald eagles popping up at any given time, you always want a view. That’s why we think our guests will especially love the Quest’s dining room. Not just for the delicious food we will serve, but for the wraparound floor to ceiling windows and ability for incredible wildlife sightings when you least expect it. Forward, on the bow, it’s possible to have Dall’s porpoise riding the pressure wave created by the ship in motion. It’s an awesome sighting and with our tiered-viewing platform, guests will never have to fight for the perfect view. (Not to mention, the sun deck with its varied seating options and bar will the place to be as we take in the scenery in Glacier Bay National Park.)

I’m also excited about giving guests the opportunity to see what no one (not counting researchers) has ever really seen in Alaska. The undersea specialist routinely shares video footage of these rich waters—which is fascinating enough. But with Quest, we’ll be able to take things further, deploying a very maneuverable ROV to capture footage of reaches far deeper than divers are capable of going. Our guests will quite literally be able to see parts of Alaska unseen to anyone.

Being a summer destination and popular with families, I’m glad to see our travelers taking advantage of the six sets of connecting cabins in Categories 1 through 3. And those step-out balconies in the category 4 cabins – I can only imagine how freeing it will feel to be out there as the ship passes through Misty Fiords or the sheer faces of Tracy or Endicott Arm. But you won’t be spending too much time in the cabins, because the mountains will be calling and the array of kayaks, Zodiacs and stand-up paddleboards will be there to help you explore Alaska to its fullest.”

Marc Cappelletti, VP of Expedition Development