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EXPLORATIONS – A Lindblad Expeditions Blog

News

How Will the Solar Eclipse Affect Wildlife?

By Ralph Lee Hopkins, National Geographic Photographer and Director of Expedition Photography

Big horn sheep along the Snake River, Idaho. Photo by Linda Burback.

Where will you be on August 21st?

If you’re reading this you’ve probably already made your plans. Wherever you are, and however you plan to experience the event, be observant of everything around you.

How will the plants and animals around you react to the darkened sky? Will the birds stop singing and become silent? Will frogs start croaking? About what about the fire flies?

Three of our ships, National Geographic Sea Bird, National Geographic Sea Lion, and National Geographic Quest will be plying the waters of the Inside Passage in Southeast Alaska, where the eclipse will be just less that 60% of totality. We’re all curious to know how the wildlife will react. For example will humpback whales take advantage of the darkened skies, perhaps becoming more active feeding on schooling fish and plankton that rise to the surface at night?

Want to take part in recording your observations and gathering data to add to the understanding of behavioral ecology? The California Academy of Sciences is soliciting citizen scientists to record their observations of plant and animal behavior during the event on their iNaturalist app available on the App Store or Google Play. For more information visit iNaturalist.org.

And don’t forget to wear special eclipse glasses and take pictures with your iPhone or digital camera. Google and University of California Berkeley have joined forces to compile photographs taken of the eclipse from across the country. Check out the Eclipse Megamovie 2017 project for more information.

Enjoy the show!

Sven-Olof Lindblad: My thoughts on the Paris Climate Accord

June 3, 2017
Dear Traveler,

This week, I believe, has been a very sad one as the United States declared our exit from the Paris Climate Accord.

Many of you know and have seen firsthand the effects globally of climate change. I certainly have over 40 years of travel: from Inuits in the Arctic, whose winter hunts are becoming fewer and more dangerous because of thinning sea ice; farmers in Ecuador’s highlands, where crops are wiped out with increasing heavy rainfall; Pacific islanders whose low atolls have become increasingly more flooded by stronger storms and rising sea levels; to witnessing massive destabilization of Antarctic ice shelves.

These, and countless other events around the world are not theory—they are fact. Science is not red or blue, it is rooted in fact. Many argue, and I am in agreement, that climate change is the greatest threat mankind faces.

And now we stand with Syria and Nicaragua as the only nations in the world who are not part of the Paris Climate Accord.

How can this possibly be? How could we, the United States of America, isolate ourselves from what clearly is a global call for essential change? And what should we do about this?

I firmly believe that travelers represent some of the most powerful voices—people who venture out into the world, see things firsthand—the wonder, the beauty, but also the changes. People who talk with others different from themselves and hear their stories.

I would like to ask you to consider a request. I would like to aggregate stories—your stories. A single event, something you saw or felt, a conversation you had that illustrates the importance of natural systems, or defines change.

I will compile these and find as many ways as I can to share them, to give voice to the voiceless, to flood the political community, not with statistics and science, but with stories from travelers who have seen and experienced things that they have not.

If you could keep them to no more than one page that would be great.

Please send your stories to: news@expeditions.com with MY STORY in the subject line.

Our relationship as humans with our environment has been so radically altered in the past 50 years that we will not be able to live up to the most important single promise our children deserve and have a right to: a world without diminished opportunity.

It’s really far more than climate change in isolation. If we are really honest, we must conclude that the world’s natural systems have been and continue to be under major assault. Nature in reasonable balance now only exists in pockets, national parks, marine protected areas, and reserves of one kind or another.
And while many of these assaults on natural systems are to some degree, or at least feel to some degree, regional, climate change is truly global.

Our behavior in Beijing, London, Tokyo, New York, and everywhere profoundly affects islanders you will never know in Kiribati, Inuits on the remote shores of Greenland, and nomadic tribesmen in Kenya. They have so little power, so little voice, yet they know about change, and they deeply fear for their children’s future.

This cannot be considered fair. Just as the reckless abandonment of global leadership cannot be considered fair.

Thank you for reading, and I hope to get thousands of stories—your stories—very soon.

All the best,

 

 

Sven Lindblad

P.S. I sincerely hope that this in no way sounds political. I, like you, am a traveler, and I feel a deep appreciation for what our environment has provided all of us. We need our natural systems to be healthy, alive and vibrant, no matter what our political beliefs may be.

10% of World’s Mangrove Finches Aboard National Geographic Endeavour II

Hatched between 0200-0500 aboard National Geographic Endeavour II Thursday en route to the Charles Darwin Research Station.

It is the rarest bird in Galápagos with an estimated population of just 80 individuals—and 8 of their eggs were just safely transported to the Charles Darwin Research Station via our ship National Geographic Endeavour II. And even better news—one of the eggs hatched en route! Beau Parks, lead keeper at San Diego Zoo’s Avian Propagation Center, was aboard with the team from the Mangrove Finch Project who are bringing the 7 eggs and one hatchling back to the Charles Darwin Research Center. Thank you Fanny Cuninghame, Mangrove Finch Project Leader at the station, for trusting us with this precious cargo. The eggs and hatchling retrieved on this expedition, the latest in a multi-year collaboration between the San Diego Zoo and the CDRS to give the birds a a head-start. It’s a good day for conservation in the islands. We’re thrilled to be support this important work.

You’re looking at 10% of the world’s Mangrove Finch population aboard our ship in Galápagos.

SEA CHANGE — Fish as Food or Wildlife?

Global Efforts to Protect Our Depleted Ocean Ecosystems Present Difficult Choices for a World That Depends on the Consumption of Fish

By Kristin Hettermann, Grace Delivers

My seafood vs. wildlife conundrum about fish really started about two years ago, when I started traveling the world with a partner who shares my deep love of the ocean. We began exploring, ocean by ocean. The more I saw, the more I learned. We witnessed pristine seas, rich in wildlife, but commonly saw destroyed ocean ecosystems. The more I experienced, the more I felt both strong love and awe for the ocean, and also a heavy concern for the loss of fish and ocean destruction. Over 70% of the earth is covered in ocean, and reports point to the fact that ocean fish populations have been cut in half since 1970. That’s a lot of life on earth lost.

Where did all the fish go? We have consumed them. Nearly three billion people rely on fish as an important source of protein. The trend seems to be: eat the big fish. When they are depleted, eat smaller fish. When they are gone, only the smallest edible fish will remain, and we will, out of necessity, eat them. Eventually, all of them. Until the fishermen catch what they refer to as “the last fish.” Scientists refer to this chain reaction as “fishing down the food chain.” In the 1870s, Atlantic cod were so abundant in the North Atlantic Ocean that it was a popular belief that one could walk across the ocean on the backs of cod fish and never get wet. Today, there is barely a geographical area in the world unspoiled by fishing and containing primeval, non-exploited fish populations and intact ecosystems. Aside from a few remote, far-off reaches of the globe, most places are missing their stars of the sea.

There are still some spectacular exceptions to this devastating trend. Hope spots: places where you see and experience biomass as it swirls around you and the abundance darkens the waters above. It is in these areas, mostly “no-take” protected zones and remote areas far from humans, that I began to understand what it felt like to be a fish. I saw life through their eyes—sometimes looking into their eyes. Because of this connection, I then lamented the loss of these creatures at a personal level—something I had never experienced. But my heartache soon turned to hope and a new determination to take action to inspire others to understand the fragility of these ecosystems and work toward solutions.

Recently, I dove in the Galápagos, a place found to have the largest shark abundance in the world. Healthy oceans need sharks. Marine biologists point to the presence of large predatory fish as a sign of the health and resilience of an ocean system. What I found in the Galápagos was biomass unlike anything I had ever seen—massive schools of fish, from the surface to the depths.

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Turning an 800-Year-Old Tree Into A Story of Reconciliation

By Sharon Eva Grainger, Naturalist & Lindblad-National Geographic certified photo instructor

James Hart carving. Photo by Sharon Grainger. 

All cultures create monuments to represent and commemorate an aspect of their history and ancestry. In the Pacific Northwest First Nations people carve these stories in tall and ancient Western red cedar. Since the end of September, James Hart, his family and several colleagues have been in the final stages of carving an 800-year-old tree, transforming it into their story of Reconciliation. The pole is being completed behind the Museum of Anthropology on the UBC campus in Vancouver British Columbia. The creation of this 70-foot tall story pole actually started far to the north in Haida Gwaii more than two years ago.

I have been very fortunate to watch this process from the beginning. Working for Lindblad Expeditions-National Geographic as a naturalist and photo instructor, I travel with guests for two weeks, once in the spring and again in the fall, aboard the National Geographic Sea Lion and Sea Bird through the Inside Passage from Washington State, through British Columbia to Southeast Alaska. In the spring, we travel north, following the migrating animals and birds returning to their feeding and nesting grounds. In the fall, we travel south, following the return of the salmon, an ever changing bounty. These fish return to their natal rivers, flowing through Alaska, British Columbia, Washington, and Oregon, providing food for bears, birds, small forest creatures, and for all humans who celebrate in the harvest of these fish. In the spirit of this place, our small vessels journey through the waters of the Inside Passage following canoe paths of generations of Native and First Nations people who have called this land home and celebrated the abundance of land and sea. Indigenous peoples are resilient, living their culture in spite of generations of trials and tribulations. They constantly consider how they are treating the Earth and how to preserve it for the next seven generations who will follow in their footsteps.

A highlight of our journey is a visit to Haida Gwaii, an archipelago, located approximately 62 miles off the coast of Northern British Columbia. Crossing Hecate Strait and waking up in Haida Gwaii is heartily welcomed by staff, crew, and guests. I often rise early, walk out on deck and watch the approach to the dock in Queen Charlotte City, excited to be in another home along the Northwest coast. I am looking forward to visiting old friends and seeing where the months have taken us all! Once our guests are on shore, we board two school busses, the only available transportation large enough for all of us, and make our way north along the length of Graham Island to the community of Old Massett.

Old Massett is one of several communities in Haida Gwaii where the resurgence of Haida culture and art can be found. Over the last three years our travels here have included extraordinary visits to the home and workplaces of Haida Artists. In Old Massett, in the late 1960s a new totem pole was raised, the first one in nearly 100 years. Today, 50 years later, as we walk around the community we see many totem poles, carved canoes, painted house fronts and signs advertising argillite carving.

I think back on my first visit to James and Rosemary Hart’s home three years ago. I often reflect on those moments being welcomed into the home of a renowned living Haida artist with his family all around him. His home was his studio, his studio was his home. It was a visual feast: tools, future plans for projects, and so many implements associated with family life covered in form line design. When I really listened, I heard James speak about Haida Gwaii, a land he is firmly a part of. I could not only see the sharp and precise motions he made in carving, but I became aware that it was exactly how he spoke, carefully choosing words, shaped to make the same impact as a crooked knife or elbow adz makes in red cedar.

In these last weeks I have been fortunate enough to watch as James and members of his family and community continue transforming this 70-foot Western red cedar log into the Reconciliation Pole that tells the painful story of the residential schools of Canada.

From 1876 until 1996, when the last federally-operated residential school was closed, the Canadian government removed First Nations children from their homes and communities to eradicate First Nations language and culture. As a result of the effect on First Nations people in Canada, the Truth and Reconciliation commission was officially established on June 2, 2008 and completed in December of 2015. The James Hart Reconciliation Pole was inspired “To keep the memory of residential school history alive. Through understanding, through truth, through respect, forward movement can happen.”

Northwest coast art is constantly evolving. The Reconciliation Pole tells a story in wood but James has taken that idea a step further by placing a residential school near the center of the pole “to look like it was dropped onto the heads of the people.” The carvings below the school represent the world of the Haida people before the children were removed from their families and villages. A mother bear and her cubs, a shaman in ritual, salmon, and the central figure of Raven, the trickster. Raven not only cajoled the first humans out of a clam shell in his trickster voice but also brought the sun, moon and stars to the world of Haida Gwaii along with many other things the Haida people enjoy today. Above the school are the children with numbers carved into their torsos, as was the custom during the time of the residential schools, where children were only known by numbers.

James is working with different indigenous carvers from North America carving the faces of these children. Fifty-seven-thousand-two-hundred solid copper nails are being pounded into various parts of the totem pole represent children who died while attending residential schools across Canada. Above the carved children, the spirit figures of a killer whale, bear, eagle and thunderbird representing water, land, air, and the supernatural moving the story towards the future with hope. Above these figures there is a carved mother, father, and children showing “the family unit getting stronger today.” Following upward another symbol of reconciliation: water waves and two boats. One is a non-native long boat, the other, a traditional First Nations Canoe representing reconciliation between indigenous and non-indigenous peoples moving forward together. At the top of the pole an eagle is poised about to take flight. This part of the carving was done by James and his late son Carl, an expression of keeping those we have lost close to us, always near in our hearts. As James would say, “that motion of flight taking us towards our future.”

When this pole was shipped in late September from Haida Gwaii to Vancouver it was scheduled to be raised on October 15, 2016. That date has been changed to accommodate ongoing meetings with the Musqueam band council, whose unceded lands include the UBC campus. All parties involved are now completing decisions on the exact location for the raising of the pole and that date has been delayed until March of 2017. An honoring celebration was held on October 15, 2016 in support of the Reconciliation Pole, hosted by James Hart and his family. Many supporting Northwest Coast people and community members across borders were in attendance. Speeches, blessings, and a fine meal were shared by all!

The delay of the raising of this pole has allowed many people within the Pacific Northwest to be involved, to share, to witness and to help in completing the Reconciliation Pole.

I will continue to write segments throughout the winter to inform, not only all our guests who have watched the carving of this pole, but our communities both in Canada and the United States about its progress. I look forward to sharing more as this project moves towards the raising of the Reconciliation Pole this coming spring.

Dos-Polacas – Photography, Heart & Stories
Founded by Sharon Eva Grainger and Pamela Pakker/Kozicki

The Seychelles & Beyond, an Expedition of Reconnection

Story and photos by Kristin Hettermann

In a very special journey connecting generations of sustainable tourism, Lindblad Expeditions’ Founder and CEO Sven-Olof Lindblad traveled to the Seychelles in April to join National Geographic Orion on an expedition through this stunning Indian Ocean island nation.

He was greeted in Mahé, the capital of the Seychelles, by Sir James Mancham, the founding President of the Seychelles. Also a longtime friend of Sven’s father, Lars-Eric Lindblad, Sir James has a longstanding history of support for Lindblad Expeditions and was to join the Orion expedition through the Seychelles as a special guest and Global Perspectives guest speaker. Sir James is a notable global personality, in addition to his role in Seychelles politics he is known to be an International Promoter of the Global Forum for Peace, Reconciliation and Prosperity.

The Lindblad name is synonymous with economic development and sustainable tourism in the Seychelles through the early efforts of Sven’s parents, Lars-Eric Lindblad and Sonia Lindblad, historically recognized as pioneers of the Seychelles tourism industry. Lindblad efforts originally came to the Seychelles in the 60’s to open up international tourism through their Lindblad Explorer eco-cruises — long before the Seychelles opened its international airport. At this time, it was evident that the Seychelles needed tourism to vitalize the precarious economy of the country, but there was a genuine focus on it being done without destroying the wildlife or scenic beauty of this pristine paradise.

The Lindblad seal of approval has subsequently been influential in the Seychelles for many decades. Thousands of travelers have been introduced to the Seychelles through Lindblad cruises and also the development of Travel Services Seychelles, which became the top travel agency in the Seychelles in the 70’s and 80’s. The government wanted to recognize this important relationship by officially awarding Sven the high honor of Cultural Ambassador during his recent visit.

“Tourism started in earnest when people ventured beyond their own borders to see cultural and historical sites of interest. This is what the Lindblad Group were doing when they added Seychelles onto their list of “must-visit” destinations decades ago,” said the Seychelles’ Minister of Tourism and Culture Alain St. Ange, emphasizing their sharing of the “tourism through culture” and eco-conscious platforms.

Sven and Sir James left Mahé on April 13 and flew by small plane to Assumption island, part of the Aldabra archipelago, to meet the Orion and over 100 guests who had made the first few days of the expedition from Tanzania across the Indian Ocean. Once coming aboard, Orion cruised the Aldabra atoll and other islands in the Seychelles group before returning to Mahé on April 23.  Travelers enjoyed some of the best snorkeling and scuba diving in the world, impromptu whale watching, nature walks, the magical Valle du Mai (home of the largest coconut in the world, the Coco de Mai) and inspiring talks by National Geographic photographers and the esteemed Sir James.

The visit to Aldabra, a UNESCO World Heritage site, was of particular interest to the group. Uninhabited (with the exception of a small research center) and extremely isolated, Aldabra is the world’s second largest coral atoll and virtually untouched by humans. Known as “one of the wonders of the world,” the atoll is the largest raised coral reef in existence (elevation of 26 feet) and boasts the largest population of the extremely rare giant tortoises (about 100,000 animals). Aldabra also has a large population of the world’s largest terrestrial arthropod, the coconut crab; and hosts the Aldabra rail, the only surviving flightless rail species in the Indian Ocean.

In 1978, Lars-Eric Lindblad, Tony Beamish and Sir James joined forces in an international influence campaign and were instrumental in stopping the Anglo-American decision to turn Aldabra into a military base. Lars-Eric Lindblad covered many aspects of his association with the Seychelles in his story, Passport to Anywhere, which was published in 1983 by Times Book, a division of the New York Times. Included in his expose is background of this influential campaign, where conservation beat politics and now decades later awards the sea to tell the story.

The efforts of a small group of people campaigning to keep Aldabra, and its giant tortoises, preserved and protected eventually resulted in the build-up of the Anglo-US military complex shifting away from the Seychelles and eastwards to the Chagos archipelago. The Seychelles Island Foundation (SIF), a public trust of Seychelles, took over the management and protection of the atoll in 1979, it was declared a Special Nature Reserve in 1981, and became a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1982.

One of the real highlights of the trip was having Sir James on board as a Global Perspectives guest speaker. Sir James, known as the Founding President of the Seychelles, also lived in exile from the country for 15 years after his opposition staged a coup in 1977. It was during this time in exile that he was invited to travel freely on Lindblad Expeditions, sharing his knowledge and stories with eager travelers. Sir James recalls discovering French Polynesia, Micronesia and Europe with fond memories during these times.

Today the world has become a village. Sven, his mother and Sir James met in New York from various parts of the world for an unlikely reunion in September 2015. Sir James was in New York speaking at a conference on peace and conflict resolution, something that he spends a fair amount of his time doing now around the world. 

Sven reflected on the reunion, “My mother looked at Jimmy when he walked in and said, ‘How long has it been?’ ‘Too long, too long,” he replied and then they went on to tell stories. They had accomplished a lot together in the Seychelles in the 70’s and 80’s. I listened mostly with considerable admiration and realized I might never have experienced the beautiful Seychelles if it were not for the confluence of Sir James and my parents.”

The Galápagos Gang Greets Philadelphia

Worlds collided at the Phillies game this Sunday, as mascots from local schools and pro teams gathered at Citizens Bank Park for the Phillie Phanatic’s birthday celebration.  But the big surprise came when the Phanatic’s friends from afar, the Galápagos Gang, charged onto the field.

Never before seen in south Philly, Bessie, a blue-footed boobie, Sid, a Galápagos sea lion, Iggy, a land iguana, and Calvin, a giant tortoise, all appeared in their Phillies finest for the celebration. Legend has it that the Phanatic came to Philadelphia from the Galápagos Islands 37 years ago. And a few years ago he joined us to revisit his homeland—quite a surprise to our guests aboard National Geographic Endeavour.

The reunited Galápagos Gang did not miss a beat as Bessie, Sid, Calvin and Iggy joined the Phanatic in the stands.  They danced.  They goofed around.  Young fans and families looked on in wonderment, as if they were seeing their favorite players up close.

The Phanatic’s real birthday surprise came when Citizens Bank announced that the Galápagos Gang is taking up residence in south Philly. That’s right, they’re staying! And the citizens of Philadelphia will be hearing more about these creatures of the Galápagos as the season continues.

The celebration culminated with one lucky fan winning our Galápagos expedition to see the islands and their extraordinary creatures for herself. Maybe she’ll find a little Phanatic. It seems stranger things have happened.

By Marc Cappelletti, Director of Expedition Development 

Sven Lindblad Appointed Cultural Ambassador of Seychelles

The Seychelles Ministry of Tourism has appointed Sven-Olof Lindblad, CEO of Lindblad Expeditions, as Cultural Ambassador of Seychelles.  The presentation of the official document of his accreditation was made by Minister Alain St. Ange, responsible for Tourism and Culture, at a dinner held on April 11th in honor of Sven Lindblad at the residence of Sir James Mancham, the founding President of the Republic of Seychelles.

The Lindblad family was integral to tourism development in Seychelles from its inception. Sven’s father, renowned adventure-travel pioneer Lars-Eric Lindblad, brought his expedition ship to Seychelles in the 1960’s, even before the opening of the Seychelles International Airport. A deep friendship and collaboration developed between Lars Eric and Sir James, and together they worked to open up the Seychelles to travelers while ensuring that the magnificent natural riches would be protected.  That collaboration continues today, with Sven Lindblad and the 102-guest National Geographic Orion in the Seychelles for a series of voyages exploring the archipelago.

In making the appointment, Minister Alain St.Ange said, “Tourism started in earnest when people ventured beyond their own borders to see cultural and historical sites of interests. This is what the Lindblad Group were doing when they added Seychelles onto their list of must visit destinations. As we welcome back the Lindblad Group this time through Sven Lindblad, the head of the organization,  we say thank you for your support and for flying our flag high.”

“Seychelles is a tourism destination where its culture has been positioned at the base of its tourism development and it is with this ‘tourism through culture’ tag line that we have the pleasure to appoint you Cultural Ambassador for the Seychelles” he continued.

Sir James Mancham and Sven Lindblad then embarked on National Geographic Orion for an expedition that will explore the Aldabra archipelago—a Seychelles World Heritage Site—and other islands of the Seychelles. Sir James will serve as a Global Perspectives guest speaker on the voyage, where he will share his unique insights and knowledge of the region with the guests.

On Hallowed Ground in Haida Gwaii

Exploring the British Columbian Archipelago’s Most Remote Sacred Site

By Marc Cappelletti

I am walking in the footsteps of chiefs and carvers, warriors and weavers, shamans and slaves; people as connected to the land as the very trees from which they once made their homes.  The ground is soft.  It is sacred.  And it lies at the edge of the world—Haida Gwaii, British Columbia.

We are at the ancient village of SGang Gwaay Llnagaay, formerly known as Nan sdins or Ninstints, on the eastern edge of SGang Gwaay (Anthony Island).  The most remote place in Canada’s most remote archipelago, some 160 miles south-west of Prince Rupert, the environment here is as abundant in natural and cultural resources as it is unforgiving.  So abundant in fact that UNESCO listed SGang Gwaay as a World Heritage Site in 1981, the same year that they cataloged the Serengeti, Great Barrier Reef, and the Old City of Jerusalem and its walls.

Just up from the rocky landing site, we have our first look at the eroding and silvered totem poles that line the shore.  Made from red cedar, and carved to display the crests of their owners—eagles and ravens, bears, beavers and more—the poles have endured for 150 to 200 years or more.  From yards away, without even a clear view, I feel what no photo could ever hope to capture.

“Each pole contained the essential spirit of the individual or family it commemorated,” said famed Haida artist Bill Reid.  “…as well as the spirit of the artist who made it, and by extension, the living essence of the whole people…”

Some poles, known as mortuary poles, were erected to hold the remains of the village’s high ranking chiefs, who at one time looked after hundreds of inhabitants in an area no larger than two square miles.  For the Haida Watchman who live in a small cabin on site and greet visitors, they are showing us the physical and spiritual remains of their ancestors.  Ask them about the poles and their spines straighten.

“These men watched over our people and this land,” one of the watchmen, Ken, himself a carver, says of the chiefs.  “Now we are here to watch over it while they are in the spirit world.”

Barbara Wilson, a Haida educator, resident of Skidegate Village, and cultural interpreter for our voyage, explains further. “It was respectful to put our chiefs up high on the mortuary poles and not to bury them in the ground.  It was the ultimate sign of respect.  And we are honored to have them amidst us, even after their deaths.”

The village site is much more than its totem poles.  Large cedar beams on the mossy forest floor show where longhouses once stood.  Centuries old, they are a reminder that these “islands at the edge of the world” have for so many been the islands around which the world turns.  I snap a photo, knowing it is like taking a shot of a wave and calling it the ocean.

“SGang Gwaay Llnagaay is a special, special place,” Wilson says when I ask what the village means to her.  “It’s…” she pauses and I sense that she wants to pour a lifetime’s worth of emotion into what comes next.  But it’s too much.  She takes a breath.  “…It’s just a really special place.”

There is a reason for her hesitation.  In the mid-19th century the total population of Haida Gwaii was ravaged by an introduced smallpox epidemic and a once a mighty Nation of around 25,000 fell to below 600.  Whatever art, stories and sacred ways of life they had left were stripped by Christian missionaries.  The last of the Haida left SGang Gwaay for good in 1880.  The remains of their chiefs stayed behind.

With damp eyes, we follow a trail away from the village site, through deep, vertically-walled gorges and lush patches of cedar, spruce and alder.  We link up with a second Watchman, Nick, who is the college-aged grandson of a Haida chief.  It is his first day on the job.  He has yet to memorize the information, but he reads with conviction.  After a minute his notepad seems to vanish and I find myself looking in the woods for the spirits he describes, as if they could emerge at any moment.

“When I visit those sites I need time to be by myself,” Wilson says.  “To just sit and think.  And remember the times I’ve been there and heard the beating of the drums.”

She is referring to the drums of her ancestors, which other Haida say they have heard when they are on sacred ground.  Having spent time with Barbara and having seen the indelible link between the Haida and their ancestors I can say this: it is not poetic license.  She has heard the drums.  The drums are real.

We press on, and Haida Gwaii eventually becomes lost to the mist of the Inside Passage.  Still, I feel the soft pull of the forest.  I want to know more of the totem poles and the drums, of struggles and wildness and prideful people.  Like a kid around a campfire, I want to hear more stories.  And I will, someday, I know.  Because even as we stare at Alaska’s soaring glaciers, I see myself walking on hallowed ground again.  I can feel the spirits in the trees.

This voyage was taken with Lindblad Expeditions-National Geographic.


Announcing New 2016 European Itineraries on National Geographic Orion

Following the Antarctic season in early 2016, National Geographic Orion will set course for Europe where she will spend spring, summer, and fall on a highly curated series of 22 one-week voyages.

The voyages will provide a unique take on a familiar geography, with innovative itineraries that will explore Portugal, Spain, France, England, Ireland, Holland, Belgium, the Baltic Republics, and Scandinavia.

“A ship like National Geographic Orion depends heavily on past guests, and a vast majority of her past guests have been to the Kimberley and the South Pacific.  We are committed to providing them the most compelling opportunities available on the Orion, and have listened to their feedback for new destinations,” stated Sven Lindblad, Founder & President of Lindblad Expeditions.

The voyages will be led by an extraordinary team with a diverse scope of expertise about the countries being explored covering ancient & modern history, political science, art, viniculture and music, as well as leading active options such as hiking, biking and kayaking. Special speakers will be drawn from the top tiers of journalism, science, and world affairs to add relevant insights as part of the ‘Global Perspectives Speakers’ program, and each voyage will feature a National Geographic photographer. The itineraries have been designed to afford guests the option to take consecutive voyages to discover a range of destinations.

On board dining will continue to be an integral part of the experience and will feature degustation menus by one of Australia’s renowned international chefs, Serge Dansereau, principal of Sydney’s The Bathers’ Pavilion. The cuisine will be influenced with the flavors of the region.

The 102-guest National Geographic Orion’s size and level of comfort will be highly appealing for European travel. The interior is spacious and offers a range of modern public rooms with panoramic views. Her public rooms include a window-lined main lounge, as well as an observation lounge and library at the top of the ship. In addition, a dedicated theatre provides a unique setting for specialist presentations, films or slideshows.