News

Our return to Egypt

New York, NY, January 19, 2018 — Lindblad Expeditions has announced its return to Egypt with a remarkable 13-day journey, Passage Through Egypt.  The epic adventure combines explorations of Cairo and stays at the exclusive Nile Ritz-Carlton and the historic Mena House, with a six-night cruise on the Nile aboard the elegant and intimately-sized, 42-guest Oberoi Philae.  From Read more…

By Kim, ago
News

How Will the Solar Eclipse Affect Wildlife?

By Ralph Lee Hopkins, National Geographic Photographer and Director of Expedition Photography Where will you be on August 21st? If you’re reading this you’ve probably already made your plans. Wherever you are, and however you plan to experience the event, be observant of everything around you. How will the plants Read more…

By rocky, ago
News

SEA CHANGE — Fish as Food or Wildlife?

Global Efforts to Protect Our Depleted Ocean Ecosystems Present Difficult Choices for a World That Depends on the Consumption of Fish By Kristin Hettermann, Grace Delivers My seafood vs. wildlife conundrum about fish really started about two years ago, when I started traveling the world with a partner who shares my deep love of the ocean. We began exploring, ocean by ocean. The more I saw, the more I learned. We witnessed pristine seas, rich in wildlife, but commonly saw destroyed ocean ecosystems. The more I experienced, the more I felt both strong love and awe for the ocean, and also a heavy concern for the loss of fish and ocean destruction. Over 70% of the earth is covered in ocean, and reports point to the fact that ocean fish populations have been cut in half since 1970. That’s a lot of life on earth lost. Where did all the fish go? We have consumed them. Nearly three billion people rely on fish as an important source of protein. The trend seems to be: eat the big fish. When they are depleted, eat smaller fish. When they are gone, only the smallest edible fish will remain, and we will, out of necessity, eat them. Eventually, all of them. Until the fishermen catch what they refer to as “the last fish.” Scientists refer to this chain reaction as “fishing down the food chain.” In the 1870s, Atlantic cod were so abundant in the North Atlantic Ocean that it was a popular belief that one could walk across the ocean on the backs of cod fish and never get wet. Today, there is barely a geographical area in the world unspoiled by fishing and containing primeval, non-exploited fish populations and intact ecosystems. Aside from a few remote, far-off reaches of the globe, most places are missing their stars of the sea. There are still some spectacular exceptions to this devastating trend. Hope spots: places where you see and experience biomass as it swirls around you and the abundance darkens the waters above. It is in these areas, mostly “no-take” protected zones and remote areas far from humans, that I began to understand what it felt like to be a fish. I saw life through their eyes—sometimes looking into their eyes. Because of this connection, I then lamented the loss of these creatures at a personal level—something I had never experienced. But my heartache soon turned to hope and a new determination to take action to inspire others to understand the fragility of these ecosystems and work toward solutions. Recently, I dove in the Galápagos, a place found to have the largest shark abundance in the world. Healthy oceans need sharks. Marine biologists point to the presence of large predatory fish as a sign of the health and resilience of an ocean system. What I found in the Galápagos was biomass unlike anything I had ever seen—massive schools of fish, from the surface to the depths. (more…)

By rocky, ago
News

The Seychelles & Beyond, an Expedition of Reconnection

Story and photos by Kristin Hettermann In a very special journey connecting generations of sustainable tourism, Lindblad Expeditions’ Founder and CEO Sven-Olof Lindblad traveled to the Seychelles in April to join National Geographic Orion on an expedition through this stunning Indian Ocean island nation. He was greeted in Mahé, the Read more…

By rocky, ago
News

The Galápagos Gang Greets Philadelphia

Worlds collided at the Phillies game this Sunday, as mascots from local schools and pro teams gathered at Citizens Bank Park for the Phillie Phanatic’s birthday celebration.  But the big surprise came when the Phanatic’s friends from afar, the Galápagos Gang, charged onto the field. Never before seen in south Read more…

By rocky, ago
News

On Hallowed Ground in Haida Gwaii

Exploring the British Columbian Archipelago’s Most Remote Sacred Site By Marc Cappelletti I am walking in the footsteps of chiefs and carvers, warriors and weavers, shamans and slaves; people as connected to the land as the very trees from which they once made their homes.  The ground is soft.  It Read more…

By rocky, ago