Daily Expedition Reports

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52 Daily Expedition Report(s) match your criteria

  • Santa Cruz Island

    It was a cloudy morning when all of our guests landed on Santa Cruz Island and headed to the facilities of the Galapagos National Park and learn about one of the most successful and iconic programs on ecological restoration of the islands, the Giant Tortoise Rearing Center. While here we talked about all of the current projects that are happening and we photographed some of the reptiles.

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  • Dragon Hill and Daphne Islet

    Located at the center of Galapagos, Santa Cruz is the second largest island on the archipelago. After a short navigation early in the morning, we arrived to Dragon Hill, named in honor of one of the iconic endemic species of the islands, the land iguana.   It was a sunny and windy day, as we headed to the landing dock, observing some migratory birds and blue-footed boobies resting on the rocks along the shallows. Juvenile sea lions captivated our guests. Walking through the small forest of cacti, we observed their long thorns, used to protect them against predators such as iguanas and giant tortoises, found along this part of the island. We crossed the white beach, observing great blue herons and some marine iguanas warming up with the first beams of the day. As we travelled inland, the landscape changed dramatically as we arrived to a forest of stripped palo santo trees, having all shed their leaves, in order to avoid dehydration during the dry season. Behind the beach, two flamingos walked indifferently along the brackish lagoon, lowering their heads into the water and feeding on small crustaceans. Closer to the shore, black-necked stilts and some phalaropes walked along the mud catching small crabs.

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  • Galapagos National Park, El Trapiche & Tomas de Berlanga, Santa Cruz

    As Grosvenor Teacher Fellows on board the National Geographic Endeavour for this expedition, we (Shasta Bray and Rebecca Detrich) were particularly excited about the activities of the day. Along with our fellow guests, we spent the morning exploring the Galapagos National Park Tortoise Rearing Center and Charles Darwin Research Station. There we viewed tortoises and land iguanas that are part of the captive breeding program while the Naturalists shared information about the most successful program of restoration of emblematic vulnerable species in the Galapagos.

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  • Floreana Island

    Floreana is a fascinating island for it has a delightful mixture of history, nature and conservation efforts. We started our day disembarking at 6:30 at Punta Cormorant. We had a walk that took us to a white coralline beach. On the way we found some Blue footed boobies performing their courtship dance and we were able to spot at a distance some Greater flamingos. On the white beach we observed many sea turtles’ nests.

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  • Floreana Island

    Floreana, also known as Charles or Santa Maria, is a peaceful island in the southern region of the Galapagos Archipelago. It was the first island to be inhabited, when Ecuador took possession of the archipelago in 1832, and it is still one of only four inhabited islands, with a population of about 160 people! In 1835, the famous naturalist Charles Darwin visited Floreana Island, and after him many more visitors became part of this island’s unique and bizarre human history, including an array of colorful characters, including marooned whalers, prisoners, colonists, a toothless dentist and a self-proclaimed empress.

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  • Española Island

    We started our expedition journey in the Galapagos Islands onboard the National Geographic Islander.

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  • Española

    Española, or Hood Island, is the oldest island in Galapagos, at approximately 4 million years of age. Even though it’s an old island, if you compare its age to the age of the planet itself, which is around 6.4 billion years, we can still see Española as a young formation. The species on this island have had more time to evolve in isolation, and we can see many interesting varieties of the Galapagos creatures here. As we started to walk among the lava, we could see that erosion had converted the lava flows into boulders. The strenuous walk took us to the nesting ground of the waved albatross—one of the part-time inhabitants of this site. We were lucky enough to see the first pair of males circling the landing area and eventually landing—what an incredible sighting this was and how worthwhile it made the walk for us.

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  • San Cristobal Island

    After an exciting expedition throughout the famous Galapagos Islands, our trip came to an end. The last island we visited was San Cristobal, located in the far-eastern part of the archipelago. This is the political capital of the islands and home to several thousand people.

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  • San Cristobal Island

    Today is our last day in paradise, on this adventure which seems unreal. We all bonded as one, even though we come from different places, as the Galapagos brings magic to our souls and mind. Traveling and reaching our destinations, from Fernandina, the youngest island in the archipelago, to San Cristobal, which is one of the oldest, on a journey of discovery through time.

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  • Santa Cruz Island

    We woke up to a view of Academy Bay and Puerto Ayora. On this beautiful morning, we visited the iconic Giant Tortoise Rearing Center, one of the most successful programs on ecological restoration in Galapagos. The program is jointly run by the Galapagos National Park Service (GNPS) and the Charles Darwin Research Station.

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Please note: Daily Expedition Reports (DER’s) are posted Monday-Friday only, during normal business hours.

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