Daily Expedition Reports

Daily reports from our days in the field


  • Glacier Bay National Park

    An early morning hike allowed sea goers to get off the ship before breakfast and stretch their legs with options of hiking through the forest or visiting a Tlingit tribal house. A lengthy immersive experience in the national park provided for wildlife viewing and stunning icy scenery.

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  • Dundas Bay, Glacier Bay National Park & Reserve

    National Geographic Sea Lion pulled into Dundas Bay early this morning. The forecast shifted, making for grey on grey day with shades of dark green. We could see the tall foot hills of the Fairweather Mountain Range in the distance,  shrouded in mist and low clouds, as the rain came and went in periodic squalls across the ship’s bow.

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  • Red Cliff, Freshwater Bay

    Aboard National Geographic Sea Bird, we awoke to a misty morning, and soon after, some lucky folks spotted a humpback whale slowly breaking the surface of the water. After stretch class and breakfast, we prepared for the morning activities of kayaking and an exploratory bushwhack of this less-visited corner of Chichagof Island. The afternoon afforded a chance to continue our whale viewing and later, we toasted our lovely time together aboard Sea Bird.

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  • Chichagof and Inian Islands

    The calm waking tone of the expedition leader coupled with blue skies and sunshine greeted us once again this morning, thus setting the mood for yet another exciting day in Southeast Alaska.  After a hearty breakfast, National Geographic Sea Lion anchored in the gorgeous protected bay called Port Althorp on the northern portion of Chichagof Island. We explored it by kayak and on foot, admiring its solitude and wildness. The salmon stream at the end of the bay had a run of chum and pink salmon and showed recent evidence of many bears feasting. Bald eagles, ravens, and gulls dotted the shorelines as they waited patiently for some more scraps and leftovers and perhaps a catch of their own. What a wonderful place of true Alaskan wildness! Once home to a salmon cannery and a Naval Auxiliary station, the area is returning to its wild roots. The only signs of human industry that remain are the few log barges, covered with slow-growing new plants, resting on the beach.

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  • Dundas Bay & Glacier Bay National Park

    It was truly a day of expedition aboard National Geographic Sea Bird. We explored a primitive area of Glacier Bay National Park by foot and expedition landing craft. Most people will visit Glacier Bay when they come to the park, either via big ship, tour operator, or kayak. Today, we had the privilege of visiting Dundas Bay, just west of Glacier Bay proper—and not on the tourist circuit at all. As such, we did not see any other people for the entire day.

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  • Lake Eva & Cruising Chatham Strait

    “Exceeding expectations” is the understatement of the week. Whether it is the weather, the landscape, or the wildlife, Alaska has been astounding guests time and time again. This morning, we woke up in Peril Strait, on our way to anchor in Hanus Bay on Baranof Island. Here, guests hiked along the length of Eva Stream to Lake Eva, looking at pink, chum, and sockeye salmon while others kayaked in Hanus Bay – some even got a glimpse at another mother brown bear and her cub before they dashed back into the forest!

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  • Glacier Bay National Park

    What is a day in the life of a Global Explorer in Alaska like? If it’s a sunshiny day in Glacier Bay National Park, it starts early! While the sun is still rising, we pick up a special guest in Bartlett Cove: a National Park Service Ranger! On the bow in a brisk dawn, we begin a journey Up Bay, on the lookout for wildlife and fun. The day has yet to behold the wonders of pristine wilderness: rainforest, glacial fjords, mountain goats, brown bears, harbor seals, tidewater glaciers, and the joy of experiencing all with family and friends.

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  • Haines, Alaska

    Early this morning, we cruised north through the stunningly beautiful Lynn Canal en route to Haines. Lynn Canal is a fjord almost 90 miles in length and 2,000 ft. deep—it’s the deepest fjord in North America. The incredibly steep walls and the deep water below are both great testament to the power of ice—glaciers about one-mile thick carved all of Southeast Alaska.

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  • LeConte Glacier & Petersburg

    Early risers were treated to an atmospheric morning at the mouth of LeConte Bay this morning. Despite being tn miles from the front of the glacier, its status as one of the most productive glaciers (in terms of iceberg production both above and below water) meant the horizon was dotted with floating crystals of azul blue. As the tide drops in the shallow mouth of the bay, icebergs are left exposed above the water, creating a safe environment for Zodiacs to wind their way along an iceberg alley. Guests were treated to the many magical shapes and forms that icebergs can take. Snowfall high up in the Stikine ice field is compressed over many hundreds of years into ice which is then twisted and contorted as part of the glacier, before being ejected in the bay to be exposed to melting by the warmer water in the bay.

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  • Endicott Arm & Dawes Glacier

    Delightfully amazing would be an accurate description of our morning. We awoke in Endicott Arm of the Tracy Arm-Fords Terror Wilderness to sunny skies and a crisp fall bite to the morning air. The scenery of the fjord was stunning: Massive chunks of ice floating peacefully, harbor seals playing hide and seek among ’bergs, and an impressive calving of ice from the face of Dawes Glacier. We sighted a black bear on shore as we navigated out of the fjord in the later afternoon. The day closed with a sunset warming the clouds to a peachy glow. A perfect start for our adventures in Southeast Alaska!

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