Daily Expedition Reports

Daily reports from our days in the field


  • Nauta Creek and Amazonas Community

    We continue to navigate the Marañon River and this morning we visited Nauta Creek. We searched for wildlife all morning from the skiffs, along the mirror-like black water streams that feed the main river.

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  • Yarapa River and Casual Forest

    As the trip continues, Delfin II makes her way closer to the convergence of the two main tributaries of the Amazon River. This morning we visited Yarapa Creek, our last visit along the Ucayali River. A quite impressive flooded area with abundant life, our guests we able to spot some new species such us wooly and spider monkeys in the treetops.

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  • Dorado River and Belluda Creek

    On our way downstream we visit Dorado River once more, this time with bright daylight, as we venture into the narrow creeks with our skiffs in search of wildlife.

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  • Ucayali River and Rio Dorado

    Today the plants of the tropical rainforest were our focus, both for photography and exploration. We walked in forest that is normally flooded, only accessible by boat, for several months of the year. Sandro, one of our local naturalists, gave a presentation on the medicinal uses of the local flora.

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  • Clavero Lake

    Sometimes it takes awhile to get to an out-of-the way place. We arrived yesterday to Nauta and started our navigation down the Río Marañon and up the Río Ucayali. The landscape (or jungle-scape) can be overwhelming, so we need to train our eyes, we need to figure out what is the aberration in the landscape, what looks like a leaf or a branch but is not. Maybe that vertical branch is the hanging tail of a green iguana basking in the early morning sun – and it was! Maybe that swirling, floating log is a swimming anteater – and it was! What a fortuitous way to start our expedition in the Amazon Basin. Luck tends to favor the vigilant, and we have learned that getting up early, and questioning the oddity in the landscape, has a wonderful payoff.

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  • Nauta Caño

    Today is our last full day exploring the Amazon tributaries.  One might think that you have “seen it all” this late in our explorations.  Oh, you can be so wrong sometimes.  The rat snake swimming across the creek at Nauta Caño was certainly a surprise, the tree with three monk saki monkeys was an unexpected pleasure, and the gentleman we found neck deep in the water with his son in a nearby canoe was a curious find.  The gentleman was diving for armored catfish eggs.  The catfish digs a hole in the muddy bank and then lays eggs in the burrow.

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  • Yarapa River and San Francisco

    We can make intentions, but the defining force in the Amazon basin is water, and this morning a light rain thwarted our early morning attempt at an outing.  After breakfast, the rains lightened. So we gathered, loaded the skiffs and navigated up the Yarapa River.  This is an area known for wooly and spider monkeys, both species of which we found languidly draped in the treetops.  A bonus sighting: a coati napping in the canopy.  It gave a big yawn and continued its morning of ease and rest.  The coati is a member of the raccoon family and looks to be made of leftover parts with its long nose, long striped tail and arboreal, as well as terrestrial, lifestyle. 

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  • Dorado River and Belluda Creek

    This morning we were up early once again and out in the skiffs for an exploration of the waterways that flow through this life-rich basin.  While at home, you may be familiar with the morning rush hour traffic sounds around you.  There is somewhat of an equivalent here.  There are whistles, beeps, sirens, squawks, and honks but these are not of motorcars. This cacophony is produced by exotic sounding creatures such as horned screamers, black-fronted nun birds, black-capped donacobius, and blue-and-yellow macaws.  These are some of the more than two dozen bird species identified during our morning outing, along with male and female three-toed sloth, saddleback tamarin, and brown capuchin monkeys. The morning sound of the tropical rain forest in the Peruvian Amazon is not “noise,” it is a symphony of life, and it is a privilege to be in the audience for this daily performance.

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  • Pacaya Samiria Reserve Creek

    Today Delfin II went to the heart of the Pacaya-Samiria Reserve. We had an early departure and enjoyed breakfast in the forest aboard our skiffs, catered by the Delfin II crew as we floated on the mirror-like waters of the Pacaya River.

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