Daily Expedition Reports

Daily reports from our days in the field


  • North Seymour and Rábida Islands

    Today we had the opportunity to explore a couple of Islands on the central realm of the archipelago, in the morning was North Seymour Island and in the afternoon Rábida Island.

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  • Genovesa Island, Darwin’s Beach and Prince Phillip’s Steps

    Final expedition, Genovesa is the northernmost Island of Galapagos, small, and flat, perfect for seabirds.

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  • Sombrero Chino & Santiago Islands

    We awakened with a strong sun warming all and a cool breeze blanketing the land. We started our day searching the coastline for any sign of life as we encountered a Great blue heron and a mass of marine iguanas sunning themselves, trying to become active to raise their temperatures. The surrounding terrain is incredible because we are close to a massive lava flow that is only 118 years old. A small forest of Candelabra cacti standout as they were present prior to the flow and were untouched by it. A wonderful snorkeling outing shows us quite a few species with a very large manta ray standing out. Heading into the afternoon we land on this new lava terrain and the details of its formation are revealed. As the sun heads towards the horizon, beams shoot through the cloud cover and illuminate numerous Galapagos penguins along the coast as they, one by one, exit the water after their foraging runs. 

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  • Bartolome and Sombrero Chino Islands

    The National Geographic Endeavour II explores the volcanic shores of Bartolome Island today; this is one of the most volcanic and young land formations in the Galapagos. Our guests will have the opportunity not only to experience the overwhelming landscape on land but also to enter the underwater realm at this location, which also happens to be a nesting site for the Galapagos penguin and home of multicolored fish and invertebrates. Sombrero Chino is a small volcanic cone eroded by weather, in between this formation and the main Island Santiago, there is a great snorkel site and our guests have another great opportunity to spot the Galapagos penguin.

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  • South Plaza and Santa Fe Island

    As first light breaks the National Geographic Islander has already set anchor in the protected waters of the northern end of the channel that separates the large island of Santa Cruz from the Plaza Islets.

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  • Santa Cruz Island

    Today we visited Santa Cruz Island on the northern side, a place known as Dragon Hill where the Galapagos National Park reintroduced land iguanas successfully decades ago. We walked along a trail after a dry landing and a brackish lagoon allowed us to see marine iguanas, pintail ducks, black-necked stilts and sanderlings. Further inland we spotted several yellow land iguanas on both sides of the trail. Land iguanas have no food source but for the opuntia cactus pads and because of this, we usually found them near the cactus trees waiting patiently for a pad to fall.

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  • Santa Cruz Island

    The National Geographic Islander dropped anchor on the Island of Santa Cruz, the second largest island in the archipelago. We had the opportunity to visit the most emblematic place in the islands, the breeding centre for Giant tortoises. Also, the town of Puerto Ayora gave our guests a good idea of how the locals cohabitate with the unique species of the Galapagos. We spent the afternoon in the highlands of Santa Cruz visiting one of the largest lava tunnels in the world, we visited a local school which is sponsored by Lindblad Expeditions and National Geographic, and toured a local coffee farm where they also produce moonshine.

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  • Santa Cruz Island

    Today we visited Santa Cruz Island where the Charles Darwin Research Station is located. There we saw different shapes of tortoise shells and especially the ones from Hood Island, which are known, as saddle-shaped shell. At noontime, we went to the highlands to visit a coffee farm where moonshine is made out of sugar cane juice. Here we learned how brown sugar is made along with the whole process of coffee. For lunch, we went to a restaurant in the cloud forest and afterwards we saw dome shaped tortoises in the wild. At night a dance with typical music was presented on board the National Geographic Endeavour II.

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  • Floreana Island

    Today we visited the Island of Floreana where we visited three different visitor sites. We enjoyed a nice walk, snorkeling, and kayaking. First we landed on Punta Cormorant where we found flamingos, stingrays, and turtles. Later we moved to Champion islet, which is one of the two places where it is possible to find the rare Floreana mockingbirds. The final site on Floreana was the famous Post Office Bay. Here we continued with the whalers’ tradition of hand delivering post cards from visitors coming to these Islands.

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  • Floreana Island

    Floreana is the Galapagos Island were humans first began colonization. Ecuador took possession of the Galapagos Islands in 1832 and established a penal colony in Floreana Island. When Darwin visited the Galapagos in 1835, the second island he landed on was Floreana.  During his stay on Floreana Island, Darwin met with some of the convicts and explored the highlands. 

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