Daily Expedition Reports

Daily reports from our days in the field


  • Floreana Island

    We visited Punta Cormorant on Floreana at 6:15 am, landed on a sandy beach and saw blue-footed boobies, flamingoes, fly catchers, lava lizards and walked a gravel path to a flour like white sandy beach used for sea turtles as a nesting site.

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  • Santa Cruz Island

    This morning we land on the second largest island in the archipelago and encounter a bustling human population. All ships visit Santa Cruz as this island has a large population of giant tortoises that we are able to encounter in the lush highlands. A very distinct vegetation zone surrounds these massive reptiles as they move in and out of the dense undergrowth, relax in the settled water ponds, and become covered in thick mud.

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  • Floreana Island

    Early morning, we start a hike where we spotted more than 40 flamingos in a salt water lagoon, sting rays at the sandy bottom, and red crabs in the black lava rocks. After breakfast, we went to ¨Champion¨, for zodiac ride, deep-water snorkel and glass bottom boat. Champion is a magical place full of life. We spot blue footed boobies, Galapagos gulls, pelicans, frigate birds and many sea lions playing along the shore. In the afternoon, we visit the Post Office Bay a historical site that used to be visited by whaling ships back in the early 1800s. Our global explorer went directly to swim and snorkel at the beach, followed by kayak and paddleboard along the shore. We spot more sea lions playing, and Pacific green sea turtles resting underwater and lava herons hunting. Another beautiful day enjoying paradise onboard National Geographic Endeavor II.

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  • Española: Gadrner Bay & Punta Suárez

    Today we reached the oldest island of the Archipelago, Española. Like San Cristobal, it also harbors a unique set of species that are endemic to Española. This includes the Española mockingbird, the Española lava lizard, the Christmas iguana; a subspecies of marine iguana that is unique to Española. We also saw waved albatross that nest on Española and La Plata Island. These magnificent birds travel all the way to Peru to feed their chicks.

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  • Gardner Beach and Punta Suarez

    Today the National Geographic Endeavour II anchored in front of Espanola Island, the oldest island of the archipelago. This is a very unique island, where we can spot many different animals that we cannot find elsewhere in the archipelago, like the albatrosses, endemic mockingbird and lava lizard.

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  • San Cristóbal: Punta Pitt & Cerro Brujo

    Today we got closest to the mainland and to one of the oldest islands of the Archipelago. Punta Pitt and San Cristóbal Island respectively.

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  • Punta Pitt & Cerro Brujo

    San Cristobal is one of the oldest islands in Galapagos, as it sits on the eastern end of the archipelago. All of the islands are the result of the activity of a stationary volcano-producing area located to the northwest of the islands.  As an extinct volcano, San Cristobal Island is now exposed to the elements and little by little, it will deteriorate to the point that it will go back to the ocean.

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  • Santa Cruz Island

    On our sixth day of the expedition, we finally encountered civilization. We awoke at Academy Bay and there were several smaller and larger ships close to us. This is the best place to see the great conservation efforts in order to preserve this unique Archipelago. The morning was spent at the giant tortoise-breeding center and our guests learned about the most successful program ran by the Galapagos National Park service. There was time to explore the cozy town of Puerto Ayora, plenty of shops are found here and the always picturesque fishermen’s market. On board of buses we went to the highlands to visit a local farm, “El trapiche”, and a lava tube. A delicious lunch was served at Rancho El Manzanillo and here our guests after lunch were delighted with a nice walk to observe Santa Cruz giant tortoises in their natural environment. It was a moment of joy and peace at heart.

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  • Santa Cruz Island

    Santa Cruz is the second largest island in the archipelago, and by far the more inhabited. We spent the entire day ashore, beginning with a visit to the Charles Darwin Research Station to learn about the giant tortoise breeding program, which has had some tremendous successes in the past few decades. The efforts to protect and re-populate the islands with giant tortoises continues to be one of the most significant and successful ecological restorations on our planet.

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  • Santiago Island

    Today we visited a central mid-aged island and had a great time visiting Espumilla as an optional early walk along the beach and an internal walk to 4 different ecosystems even one which felt like been submerge into Harry Potter’s netherworld.

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