Daily Expedition Reports

Daily reports from our days in the field


  • Santa Cruz Island

    Today we woke up to a very different view out of our windows. Rather than floating along an isolated coast, we docked in Puerto Ayora surrounded by other ships. After breakfast, we disembarked in town on Charles Darwin Avenue and boarded buses to the Charles Darwin Research Station. Although the Research Station runs multiple research studies on many Galapagos wildlife issues, its major focus is the breeding of the Galapagos tortoise species that are in danger.

    Read More
  • Espumilla Beach, Buccaneer’s Cove

    Our day started with a pleasant walk along Espumilla Beach. This pristine beach is one of the best sites to find the Galapagos hawk and blue-footed boobies plunge-diving. After our walk, we came back for breakfast. Later, guests had the option to explore Buccaneer’s Cove either by kayaking, snorkeling, or both! In the afternoon, our photo instructor shared a short presentation about creative shooting modes that could be applied for our afternoon outing. Additionally, we had a presentation about Charles Darwin and his legacy in the Galapagos. We then moved to Puerto Egas, where guests had options of trekking or snorkeling. In the evening, we had a BBQ dinner in the upper deck, with a clear sky and pleasant weather.

    Read More
  • Isabela Island

    This time of the year, the western part of the Galapagos is colder and chillier with changing conditions, but today is the exception to the rule. This morning was warm, and the ocean looked very calm. At 8 o’clock we were to disembark, and as we headed to the black beach of Urbina Bay we suddenly spotted a female humpback whale with its baby. It was great to have these cetaceans so close to us. These enormous creatures are seen from time to time, especially this time of the year, when they migrate from Alaska all the way down to South America to mate and have their babies. We were very lucky with this encounter.

    Read More
  • Santiago Island

    As members of Lindblad Expeditions, we feel proud every time we visit the island of Santiago. After a number of years and contributions, we’ve helped eliminate the feral pigs and goats that had been roaming this island. Today we visited a few visitor sites where the environments have been restored to their original status of centuries ago.

    Read More
  • Isabela and Fernandina Islands

    Today we visited the youngest islands in the archipelago. The volcanos on Isabela and Fernandina are by far the most active in South America with eruptions happening ever two to four years, and sometimes more often. In fact, one of the volcanoes of Isabela island erupted just three weeks ago.

    Read More
  • Isabela Island

    Sometime before 1954, this little corner of the Galapagos Archipelago, Urbina Bay, experienced a major uplift. Along a 5-kilometer coastline, 1.5 Km2 was pushed up and out of the sea. Yet, the movement was so smooth, so fast, that marine life was caught unable to escape. Today the corals, the white sandy bottom of the ocean, have been covered in vegetation. Sixty-four years of sporadic rainfall has flushed away the salts, and salt-tolerant vegetation has turned the area into a flourishing terrestrial habitat for land iguanas, Darwin finches, Galapagos mockingbirds, and the occasional giant tortoise that descends from the highlands of Alcedo Volcano.

    Read More
  • Isabela and Fernandina Islands

    We Woke up to a nice sunny day! There was a pleasant breeze and the ocean was calm. The naturalists had spotted wildlife, and some of us headed to the top deck of National Geographic Endeavour ll when an announcement was made.  We enjoyed the show of several common dolphins near our mother vessel, a couple of whale blows were also recognized in the distance.

    Read More
  • Bartolome and Rabida Island

    Today we explored the central area of the archipelago. Before disembarking, our guests had coffee and snacks in preparation for their first adventure of the day. We began with an early morning walk to the top of Bartolome Island. Visiting the islands early in the morning is the best time to photograph the great light conditions of this unique Galapagos landscape.

    Read More
  • North Seymour & Rabida Islands

    A grey sky looms overhead as we awaken off North Seymour Island in the central part of the archipelago. We float upon turquoise water as we start to move towards a landing, and the blue sky starts to appear overhead. Boulders underfoot as we pass through a dry environment. We find male frigate birds with inflated gular sacs trying to find mates, blue footed booby chicks awaiting food and land iguanas starting to move to the shade as the sun heats the land.

    Read More
  • Darwin Bay and Prince Phillip’s steps

    Genovesa Island’s location makes it a paradise for sea birds. It’s surrounding deep water is perfect for many sea birds with pelagic feeding habits, including the red-footed booby, the Nazca booby, the great frigate bird, the red-billed tropicbird, and the swallow-tailed gull. We also saw the short-eared owl. Visiting Genovesa was a great way to finish our expedition, and the sunset concluded this wonderful week. 

    Read More

Get our newsletter

Join us for updates, insider reports & special offers.

Privacy Policy