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  • 1 Min Read
  • 17 Jun 2022

Photos of the Week, June 17, 2022

Our field staff captured memorable animal moments in every corner of the globe this week, from a sloth mother and baby and an elusive owl species in the Amazon, to a rare sighting of a flamingo in flight in the Galápagos, to a snoozing polar bear on an Arctic ice cap and even a sheep in the Shetland Islands. No matter where we travel, guests and staff alike are constantly surprised by our furred, feathered, and finned friends. Get Inspired By Photos, Videos, Webinars, Stories, And Exclusive Offers. Sign Up

For more dispatches from the field, check out our Daily Expedition Reports.


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El Dorado River, Peru

Wild Peru Escape: Amazon & Machu Picchu, June 2, 2022

sloth and baby

Three-toed sloth and baby. —Jonathan Aguas, Naturalist/Certified Photo Instructor

 

Kelp Bay, Alaska

Exploring Alaska's Coastal Wilderness, June 2, 2022

blackrock fish

Blackrock fish were seemingly unbothered by the ROV (remotely operated vehicle) swimming right up to it. —Amy Malkoski, Naturalist/Expedition Diver

 

Pacaya River, Peru

Wild Peru Escape: Amazon & Machu Picchu, June 3, 2022

pygmy owl

The miniscule ferruginous pygmy owl is rarely seen. In addition to being so small, its camouflaged coloration makes this species difficult to spot and photograph. I spent more than ten minutes on the skiff’s bow looking for the best angle among many branches, trying to find a small gap to photograph this rare rainforest owl. —Carlos Romero, Expedition Leader

 

Haines, Alaska

Wild Alaska Escape: Juneau to Ketchikan, June 5, 2022

aerial view of glaciers

Taking off from Haines Airport this morning, we had the privileged opportunity to fly over the northeast quadrant of Glacier Bay National Park. Climbing through the verdant Chilkat River Valley, past outwash plains of glacial debris, through a thin band of clouds cradling the surrounding peaks and onto the plateau of the Brady Icefield (at around 5,000’), we transitioned from post-glacial to glaciated in mere minutes. What would have taken me a full day back when I was a young, poor, ice-crazed photographer was laid out before me in the blink of an eye. —Eric Guth, Naturalist/Certified Photo Instructor

 

Inian Islands, Alaska

Exploring Alaska's Coastal Wilderness, June 9, 2022

cormorant

A pelagic cormorant in breeding plumage goes to search for nesting material. —Ben Shulman, Naturalist

 

Santa Cruz Island, Galápagos

Galápagos Aboard National Geographic Endeavour II, June 9, 2022

saddleback tortoise with open mouth

Saddleback giant tortoise. —Christian Saa, Naturalist/Certified Photo Instructor

 

Nordfjorden, Norway

Coastal Wonders of Norway, the Faroe Islands and Iceland, June 10, 2022

kayakers

Kayakers enjoyed stunning conditions for exploring in the fjord. —Andrew Peacock, Naturalist/Certified Photo Instructor

 

Cerro Dragon, Galápagos

Wild Galápagos Escape, June 11, 2022

locust

Galapagos painted locust on the vegetation in the forest. —Ramiro Adrian, Naturalist

 

Ushk Bay, Alaska

Exploring Alaska's Coastal Wilderness, June 11, 2022

yellow flower

Yellow pond lily. —Jim Pfitzer, Naturalist/Certified Photo Instructor

 

Eastern Svalbard, Norway

Land Of The Ice Bears: An In-Depth Exploration Of Arctic Svalbard, June 12, 2022

polar bear

A polar bear peacefully sleeping on an ice floe near Austfonna ice cap. —Carl Erik Kilander, Naturalist

 

Floreana Island, Galápagos

Galápagos Aboard National Geographic Endeavour II, June 13, 2022

flamingo in flight

It is a rare sight to see greater flamingos flying—we were all delighted to see this elegant bird in flight. It is wonderful to see the thin legs fully alight, with the long neck and the beautiful black feathers of their wings. Flamingos can fly long distances. —Vanessa Gallo, Naturalist

 

Foula, Shetland Islands, Scotland

Coastal Wonders of Norway, the Faroe Islands and Iceland, June 13, 2022

sheep in front of ship

We sailed to Foula Island, one of the United Kingdom’s most remote permanently inhabited islands with a population of about 35 people. After an early dinner, we landed on the island in a very wet mist, which conveniently stopped a few minutes after arrival. Our guided hike on the moors and low along broken coastal cliffs was filled with wildflowers (including carnivorous flowers), sheep, and nesting fulmars. —Jim Coyer, Naturalist/Expedition Diver

 

Santa Cruz Island, Galápagos

Galápagos Aboard National Geographic Endeavour II, June 14, 2022

five sleeping tortoises

Tortoises are most active from 8:00 to 17:30, and after this they move to areas partly secluded by vegetation or rocks where they sleep. During the day, they actively move in search of food. They also like long naps, and they can spend up to two days resting while regulating their body temperature in waterholes, especially during the dry season. —Africa Berdonces, Naturalist

 

Faroe Islands

Coastal Wonders of Norway, the Faroe Islands and Iceland, June 14, 2022

rowers in front of mountain

A team of traditional Faroese rowers practicing in front of the stunning landscape. —Jamie Coleman, Naturalist

 

San Cristobal, Galápagos

Wild Galápagos Escape, June 14, 2022

sea lion

Sea lions differ from seals because they can use their rear flippers to walk on land, and also because they carry external ear lobes and external reproductive organs. —Bernardo Jacome, Naturalist