• WorldView
  • 4 Min Read
  • 19 Feb 2021

Head South: 5 Incredible Far-Flung Sights Worth the Trip

The saying goes, “It’s not about the destination, it’s about the journey.” But in this case, it’s actually about both. These seldom-seen sights from South America and beyond take some effort to visit, but you’ll be wholly rewarded when you arrive. Here are five awe-mazing wonders to be discovered—if you’re willing to go the distance.

Kaieteur Falls, Guyana

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To witness a waterfall that rivals few others you have to head deep within a seldom-traveled part of the Amazon, to Guyana’s Kaieteur National Park. There the spectacular Kaieteur Falls plunges 741 feet (four times the size of Niagara!) over a precipice rimmed in the most pristine rainforest. Powered by the Potaru River, a huge volume of water courses over the falls every second, making it the world’s largest single-drop waterfall. Hop aboard our private plane to reach this wonder, and when you arrive prepare to stand wide-eyed and mouth agape on the viewing promontory.

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King Penguin Colonies, South Georgia Island

Imagine coming upon 100,000 king penguins on a single beach as the sun starts to rise, casting a golden glow over the entire spectacle. That’s the once-in-a-lifetime experience that awaits in South Georgia, a remote and rugged island some 750 nautical miles from Antarctica. The sheer biomass, the ruckus, the sensory overload will boggle your mind and send your spirits soaring. Step ashore and walk among these massive colonies. Get an up-close view of their striking colors and steep in the majesty of this last wild kingdom.   

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Chilean Fjords & Glacier AlleyFjords and channels of Chile

At the near ‘end of the world,’ Chile’s impressive fjords stretch along the coast to the country’s southernmost tip. It’s a veritable feast for the eyes within these narrow inlets—soaring granite walls, tumbling waterfalls, snow-capped peaks! But the main events are the epic glaciers. In the region known as “Glacier Alley,” part of the UNESCO-recognized Cape Horn Biosphere Reserve, a series of monumental icy-blue glaciers ooze into the sea. Aboard a small ship, you’ll have the ideal vantage to witness that exhilarating moment when a new iceberg calves off the glacier with a thunderous crash.   

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Fernando de Noronha Archipelago, Brazil

Zz02NzNlMWJiM2E0MzJjZTZjMTY4ZWZkZGJkMzUyMGQ4Yw==.jpgUntouched beaches. Breathtaking turquoise water. Dramatic, volcanic rock formations. This UNESCO World Heritage site is the definition of pristine natural beauty. Located 220 miles off the northeast coast of Brazil, the archipelago’s 22 remote islands are protected as a marine national park with a limited number of visitors allowed each year. If you’re lucky enough to be one of them, you’ll encounter the islands’ most sought after residents—the lively spinner dolphins. Plus, snorkel in a sea teeming with bright fish, sea turtles, and other marine life.    

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Christ Church Cathedral & Whalebone Arch, Falkland Islands

Whalebone arch on the Falkland IslandsIn the tiny, quaint capital of the Falkland Islands, you’ll find the world’s most southerly Anglican cathedral. Consecrated in 1892, the prominent brick and stone building dominates Stanley’s seafront. It’s a crown jewel for the community and even won pride of place on their postage stamp. But what makes this church even more unique is the impressive whalebone arch standing in its yard. Built in 1933 from the jawbones of two blue whales, this one-of-its-kind monument was erected in honor of a century of British rule in the islands. And it perfectly frames the church making for a can’t-miss photo op!

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