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Photos of the Week, October 29, 2021

As our fall season winds down on the Columbia River, our field staff has had the chance to capture some incredible colors and landscapes. Meanwhile, we're exploring the Galápagos Islands year-round, but there's always surprises to spot—hawks, herons, and the rarely-spotted short-eared owl were among the exceptional photo ops. 

For more dispatches from the field, check out our Daily Expedition Reports


Have you recently traveled aboard one of our ships? Send us your favorite photo! We'd love to feature your favorite memory of your expedition. 

Bartolomé Island, Galápagos

Galápagos Aboard National Geographic Endeavour II, October 21, 2021

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Lava heron near Bartolomé. —Christian Saa, Naturalist/Certified Photo Instructor

 

Bonneville Dam, Oregon, U.S.A.

Columbia & Snake Rivers Journey, October 22, 2021

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During our passage through the navigation lock at Bonneville Dam a group of pirates, led by King Neptune, boarded the ship to help us celebrate the Last Lock of National Geographic Quest’s season on the Columbia and Snake Rivers. —David Cothran, Naturalist/Certified Photo Instructor

 

Prince Philip's Steps, Genovesa Island, Galápagos

Galápagos Aboard National Geographic Endeavour II, October 22, 2021

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Our adventure began with a walk starting at the famous Prince Philip’s Steps. My colleague, Christian, was able to find the first elusive short-eared owl and save the day! All of us felt rewarded to have a unique view to the only camouflage diurnal raptor.  —Celso Montalvo, Naturalist/Certified Photo Instructor

 

Astoria, Oregon, U.S.A.

Columbia & Snake Rivers Journey, October 24, 2021

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National Geographic Quest tied to the pier in Astoria, Oregon.—Dave Katz, Video Chronicler

 

North Seymour Island, Galápagos

Galápagos Aboard National Geographic Endeavour II, October 24, 2021

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Palo santo trees are common in the Galápagos dry forest, which is a nice word for “desert.” These trees adapt to the drought by losing all their leaves and staying dormant until the rain revives them in January. —Salvador Cazar, Naturalist

 

Astoria, Oregon, U.S.A.

Columbia & Snake Rivers Journey, October 24, 2021

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Naturalist David Cothran photographing a fly agaric mushroom, one of the most iconic of the toadstool species. —Dave Katz, Video Chronicler

 

Lewiston, Idaho, U.S.A.

Columbia & Snake Rivers Journey, October 25, 2021

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A litter of salmon roe is sprinkled among the shoreline rocks. Salmon are an anadromous fish meaning they hatch in freshwater, go to sea and several years later, then return to fresh water to spawn and die. —Linda Burback, Naturalist/Certified Photo Instructor

 

Palouse Falls, Washington, U.S.A.

Columbia & Snake Rivers Journey, October 26, 2021

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Fall colors accentuate Palouse Falls during National Geographic Sea Lion’s late October arrival. —Patrick MacQuarrie, Cultural Specialist

 

Urbina Bay, Isabela Island, Galápagos

Galápagos Aboard National Geographic Endeavour II, October 26, 2021

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Wondering how the traffic looks in the Galápagos? Yes, sometimes we get held up by giant tortoises on the path! —Ixora Berdonces, Naturalist

 

Espumilla Beach, Santiago Island, Galápagos

Galápagos Aboard National Geographic Endeavour II, October 26, 2021

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Juvenile Galapagos hawks chasing ghost crabs on the ground. —Ramiro Adrian, Naturalist