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Photos of the Week, November 5, 2021

There are some images from our expeditions that are absolutely iconic: the majestic cliffs surrounding Multnomah Falls, a close-up of vibrant blue feet on a booby in the Galápagos, a sea lion seemingly posing just for your camera. But there are always corners of these trips that never fail to surprise, and things we'd never imagine we could see in these places. For instance, did you know that the waters off of Santa Cruz Island contain an explosion of colorful sea life? Or that you can photograph an atmospheric shipwreck, reminiscent of classic maritime literature, in coastal Oregon?

 

Our field staff sent in classics as well as hidden gems this week: a few parting shots from the Pacific Northwest, and some dazzling wildlife scenes from the Galápagos. 

For more dispatches from the field, check out our Daily Expedition Reports


Have you recently traveled aboard one of our ships? Send us your favorite photo! We'd love to feature your favorite memory of your expedition. 

Multnomah Falls, Oregon, U.S.A.

Columbia & Snake Rivers Journey, October 29, 2021

guests photographing multnomah falls

 

Guests photograph 620-foot high Multnomah Falls from the deck of National Geographic Sea Lion. —Steve Engel, Naturalist

 

Astoria, Oregon, U.S.A.

Columbia & Snake Rivers Journey, October 30, 2021

wreck of the peter iredale

 

The rusted bow of the Peter Iredale rests on the sands where the ship was stranded 115 years ago. It has been a tourist attraction ever since.—Robert Edwards, Naturalist

 

Floreana Island, Galápagos

Wild Galápagos Escape, October 31, 2021

sea lion and pelican

 

While kayaking at La Loberia, we observed how this young Galapagos sea lion posed next to a young brown pelican.  —Vanessa Gallo, Naturalist

Floreana Island, Galápagos

Wild Galápagos Escape, October 31, 2021

booby chick

 

Punta Cormorant is nowadays a nesting site of blue-footed boobies. This chick was showing us its afternoon training.  —Vanessa Gallo, Naturalist

Española Island, Galápagos

Galápagos Aboard National Geographic Endeavour II, November 1, 2021

post office barrel

 

Post Office Bay is famous for its post office barrel. Originally placed here in Floreana in 1793 by whalers and sailors, it was an informal way to send and receive mail from Europe. Our guests continued the tradition of leaving postcards and taking mail to hand deliver if the address is convenient.  —Bernie Jacome, Naturalist

 

North Seymour Island, Galápagos

Wild Galápagos Escape, November 1, 2021

nazca booby

 

Without any land predators present on the island, marine bird colonies thrive on Española. Three booby species occur in the Galápagos, but only one prefers to nest along the coastal cliff of this small island: the endemic Nazca booby. —Gaby Bohorquez, Naturalist (photo by Vanessa Gallo)

 

San Cristobal Island, Galápagos

Wild Galápagos Escape, November 2, 2021

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In the morning, we dropped anchor at the easternmost point of the Galapagos archipelago, Punta Pitt. Along the trail, we encountered a blue-footed booby couple. —Vanessa Gallo, Naturalist

 

Santa Cruz Island, Galápagos

Galápagos Aboard National Geographic Endeavour II, November 3, 2021

manta ray

 

Beautiful surprise of a manta ray sighting at Guy Fawkes during our snorkeling. —Gianna Haro, Naturalist/Certified Photo Instructor