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  • 10 Dec 2021

Photos of the Week, December 10, 2021

Our Photos of the Week don't typically follow a theme, but this week, one emerged quickly: birds! This week's photos from the field were positively teeming with gorgeous photos of our feathered friends. In addition, from the National Geographic Resolution enroute to South Georgia Island, naturalist Alex Searle provided a few great tips on photographing birds that you can use no matter where you are in the world or what kind of camera you have. Get Inspired By Photos, Videos, Webinars, Stories, And Exclusive Offers. Sign Up

For more dispatches from the field, check out ourDaily Expedition Reports.


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St. Andrews Bay, South Georgia Island

Antarctica, South Georgia, and the Falklands, November 30, 2021

penguins and guests

 

Who’s watching who? King penguins stand tall against the ice-cloaked mountains at St. Andrews Bay. —Ralph Lee Hopkins, National Geographic Photographer

 

Godthul, South Georgia Island

Antarctica, South Georgia, and the Falklands, December 1, 2021

swimming penguins

 

Gentoo penguins swimming in glassy seas. —Mike Greenfelder, Naturalist/Certified Photo Instructor

 

Drygalski Fjord, South Georgia Island

Antarctica, South Georgia, and the Falklands, December 2, 2021

roosting petrel

 

Roosting snow petrel. These little petrels are remarkable creatures. One of their fun facts is that they love roosting on ice. Sometimes they make very big meetings on the huge tabular icebergs! —Javier Cotin, Naturalist

 

Elsehul, South Georgia Island

Antarctica, South Georgia, and the Falklands, December 2, 2021

thousands of penguins

 

The chaos of a macaroni penguin colony is found over 100 feet above the shoreline, requiring agility over the steep cliffs that doesn’t seem to fit the penguins’ anatomical design.—Jill Niederberger, Naturalist

 

North Seymour Island, Galápagos

Wild Galápagos Escape, December 6, 2021

two frigatebirds

 

On North Seymour Island, there is a perennial frigate bird colony. We observed a couple of magnificent frigate birds at a short distance from the trail performing a beautiful nature show. They were grooming each other, bonding their relationship. —Carlos Romero, Expedition Leader

 

Bleaker Island, Falkland Islands

Antarctica, South Georgia, and the Falklands, December 6, 2021

penguin and chick

 

A recently hatched rockhopper chick seeks out a meal from the attending parent.—Doug Gualtieri, Naturalist

 

Carcass Island, Falkland Islands

Antarctica, South Georgia & the Falklands, December 6, 2021

striated caracara

 

The striated caracaras are in great abundance here in the Falkland Islands. They are ready to take advantage of any unsuspecting prey. —Steve Morello, Naturalist/Certified Photo Instructor

 

New Island, Falkland Islands

Antarctica, South Georgia & the Falklands, December 7, 2021

cormorant

 

Nesting imperial cormorant showing its vibrant breeding colors. —Mike Greenfelder, Naturalist/Certified Photo Instructor

 

Fernandina Island, Galápagos

Wild Galápagos Escape, December 7, 2021

hawk eating an iguana

 

A Galapagos hawk perching on a rock with a recently caught baby iguana on its claws in front of the National Geographic Islander. —Ramiro Adrian, Naturalist

 

Westpoint Island, Falkland Islands

Wild Galápagos Escape, December 7, 2021

black-browed albatross colony

 

We arrived at Westpoint Island just after breakfast to discover that we are the first ship visitors to this island since the pandemic began. The two caretakers were very happy to see us. We hiked across the island to reach the famous black-browed albatross colony. After watching these albatrosses at sea for nearly three weeks, it was a thrill to observe them up close, to listen to their calls, and to observe their nesting behaviour. There are many eggs in the colony! —Jenny Kingsley, National Geographic Explorer