As if a livestream from an expedition to Antarctica wasn’t exhilarating enough, we are now bringing you in on the action by going live from one of our newest polar vessel's broadcast centers during the total solar eclipse on December 4, 2021. During the stream, our recognized experts will educate you about the eclipse, what's happening in nature during the phenomenon, and how to safely view one in the future. In the event the conditions are clear enough to view the eclipse, our shipboard photographers will capture and share some of the world’s first professional images, straight from the Southern Ocean.

Experts

Capture the Solar Eclipse with Help From Our Experts

You’ve come all this way—so come prepared to get the photo of a lifetime. Before your expedition, we’ll share info about special photography equipment you’ll need, like solar filters, to create an image of the eclipse. And thanks to our special relationship with B&H Photo Video, you’ll be able to get the necessary gear in time and with special savings. While aboard, your National Geographic photographer and Lindblad-National Geographic certified photo instructor will get you ready for the special challenges of shooting a solar eclipse from a ship, where tripods and long exposures don’t work since you’ll be situated on a moving platform.

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Get Deep Background from Illuminating Experts

Learn about the basics of solar eclipses so that you can understand what you may hopefully experience. Go deep on the science with the help of a special guest expert.

How to Photograph a Total Eclipse

Can’t wait to start learning how to create a once-in-a-lifetime image of a total solar eclipse over the Southern Ocean? Our friends over at B&H Photo Video have an extensive article with top tips for photographing an eclipse—from gear recommendations to camera settings and composition suggestions.

Read B&H Photo Video Eclipse Article >

 

You’ve come all this way—so come prepared to get the photo of a lifetime. Before your expedition, we’ll share info about special photography equipment you’ll need, like solar filters, to create an image of the eclipse. And thanks to our special relationship with B&H Photo Video, you’ll be able to get the necessary gear in time and with special savings. While aboard, your National Geographic photographer and Lindblad-National Geographic certified photo instructor will get you ready for the special challenges of shooting a solar eclipse from a ship, where tripods and long exposures don’t work since you’ll be situated on a moving platform....

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A lot of people go their entire lives without seeing a solar eclipse. You don't want to miss it because you're messing around with camera settings and filters trying to get a shot of it. We'll get you in the right spot, and we'll be sure you and your camera are ready to go when the big moment arrives.

Ralph Lee Hopkins, Director of Expedition Photography

Frequently Asked Questions

  • What is a solar eclipse?

    A solar eclipse occurs when the moon passes between the sun and the Earth, partially or totally obscuring the sun and casting a shadow over part of Earth.

  • When will the next solar eclipse happen?

    In 2021 there are two solar eclipses. The first one happened on June 10 and was an annular eclipse, which means the moon covers all but an outer ring of the sun. The second eclipse, a total eclipse of the sun, will occur on December 4.

  • Where can you see the total eclipse?

    The first solar eclipse of the year was visible in the Northern Hemisphere from parts of Russia, Canada, Greenland, and the Arctic. The December 2021 total solar eclipse will be seen over the opposite pole, across the skies of Antarctica—weather permitting. Parts of southern Africa should be able to see a partial solar eclipse.

  • Why is this solar eclipse a special event?

    It is a total solar eclipse, which is when the moon completely blocks out the sun. This type of eclipse only occurs when the moon is at the point of its orbit closest to Earth and when the Earth is at a point in its orbit that is the farthest from the sun. To see it, you must be in the path of totality, where the moon casts its darkest shadow, known as the umbra.

  • Do you need protective eyewear?

    Yes! The only way to safely view a solar eclipse is through special glasses, which we will have aboard for all.

  • Is it possible to photograph a solar eclipse?

    With the aid of some special equipment like solar filters, it is indeed possible to create an image of a solar eclipse. We’ll have a National Geographic photographer and a Lindblad-National Geographic certified photo instructor aboard to help.

Antarctica, South Georgia & the Falklands

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