Leader

Expedition Leader

For a volcanic archipelago, Galapagos doesn’t see too many eruptions. So when the call came over the radio of the bridge of National Geographic Islander that nearby Wolf Volcano was spewing lava into the sea, the ship’s expedition leader made the call along with the captain to change course and sail straight to the volcano. Guests aboard would be the first on the scene to see the lava rolling into the boiling sea, and footage shot by the ship’s video chronicler would play on news stations around the world the next day. 

It’s these kinds of once in a lifetime experiences expedition leaders enable for guests. In this case, it helped that the expedition leader and captain had lived and worked in Galapagos for over three decades. That they had the trust of every person in the national park service who would need to give them permission to approach the island. And that they sailed with the full confidence of Lindblad Expeditions senior leadership and were empowered to make the decision to deviate from the plan on the fly. 

Expedition leaders have worked in their fields and in the geographies where they sail for years. Most have advanced degrees and have conducted research or taught for years. They are deeply experienced naturalists, biologists, and historians who have achieved expedition leader status because they possess the skills, experience and the depth of knowledge necessary to continually craft the best expedition possible for guests.

They are empowered  with the personnel, resources, and opportunities to ensure remarkable expedition experiences. Their institutional knowledge is virtually impossible to match. When wind or weather might preclude a certain landing, they're using their local knowledge and collaboration with the captain to reach a more protected spot where you can go ashore safely—to actively explore. And, because an expedition depends on flexibility and the ability to take advantage of unexpected moments, they will often rewrite the day’s plan on the fly or make an announcement just as dinner is being served if a 40-ton humpback whale suddenly surfaces nearby, bow-riding dolphins appear, or a pod of narwhals is spotted. 

The caliber of the expedition leaders and their teams is the reason the Lindblad name is respected in the travel industry, and guests continually entrust their safety, valuable time, and intelligent curiosity to them.

For a volcanic archipelago, Galapagos doesn’t see too many eruptions. So when the call came over the radio of the bridge of National Geographic Islander that nearby Wolf Volcano was spewing lava into the sea, the ship’s expedition leader made the call along with the captain to change course and sail straight to the volcano. Guests aboard would be the first on the scene to see the lava rolling into the boiling sea, and footage shot by the ship’s video chronicler would play on news stations around the world the next day. ...

Read more

Expedition staff are subject to change.