Daily Expedition Reports

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Lastest Expedition Reports

  • At Sea, the Falklands and Beyond

    After leaving South America behind and traveling for a day to the Falklands, we awoke off the islands feeling some uncertainty, much like the rest of the world. What would our future hold?  We were all healthy onboard and in good spirits, so when the news came that we couldn’t disembark immediately, it was met with mixed reactions. It was determined that we would need to wait a few days (about five) until we reached a safe quarantine since our last contact with new people. At first, this seemed harsh. But in reality, it was probably better for everyone involved. We wanted to know we were all healthy, and we didn’t want to spread anything as we dispersed. And, being on board a healthy ship is a great thing. We not only had endless food, drink (wine!), and TOILET PAPER! We were onboard National Geographic Orion! The crew were ready to spoil us like always, and the staff were ready to step up with a series of presentations and activities.

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  • At Sea to the Falkland Islands

    Today we left South America behind and enjoyed following seas and wind on our way to the Falkland Islands. After spending the entirety of our voyage with land in sight, it was refreshing to wake with ocean surrounding our ship all directions with nothing but sky on the horizon.

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  • At Sea to Falkland Islands and Onwards

    Late in the afternoon on March 15, the news from the rest of the world collided with our bubble of safety and happiness onboard National Geographic Explorer. We were notified that the window of opportunity for getting our guests, staff and crew home in the midst of the COVID-19 epidemic was closing, and it was deemed prudent to abort our voyage and return early to Stanley in the Falkland Islands. Captain Oliver and the Bridge Team turned the ship around and we started the two-and-a-half day sea voyage across the Scotia Sea.

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  • Bahia Almejas

    Another day in paradise! We awoke to a gloriously sunny and warm day with beautiful light anchored off of Isla Santa Margarita. Following breakfast, we boarded local pangas (small boats) with local drivers and proceeded out to the mouth, or “boca,” where Bahia Almegas meets the Pacific. There we visited a large colony of birds resting on the sandy beach – cormorants, great blue herons, pelicans, and gulls all clustered together. Periodically a pelican would stretch its bill skyward or a raven would circle overhead, surveying the grounds for prey. The smell of all this wildlife became increasingly more experiential as we got downwind.

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  • Prion Island, Fortuna Bay & Stromness

    The day started and ended with gorgeous skies, and throughout the day we experienced one of those rare and magical confluences in South Georgia of sunny weather and calm seas. We had spent the night at anchor in the Bay of Isles and awoke early for a very short reposition to Prion Island for an opportunity to view nesting wandering albatrosses.  

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  • Bahia Almejas

    National Geographic Sea Lion commenced early this morning, navigating along Hull Canal to reach the southern part of the Magdalena Coastal Lagoon Complex, called Bahia Almejas, or Clams Bay. This is a very shallow but equally beautiful section for transiting, made by the peninsula of Baja California, the arid, broken, and foggy Santa Margarita Island and the mangrove-covered Crescent Island. Here, the gray whales come into the lagoon by a channel between Santa Margarita and Crescent Islands, although most individuals are adult males and females that gather to court and mate.

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  • Boca de la Soledad

    Known as the mouth of solitude, it connects Bahia Magdalena to the Pacific. A congregating area for adult gray whales and mother calf pairs. This was the setting for our first full day of whale watching aboard National Geographic Sea Lion. And what a first day we had! Guest experienced a full spectrum of whale behavior – from breaches and spy hops to complete baths in the exhaled mists of surfacing whales. The end of the day resonates with the sounds of Los Coyotes de Magdalena and the Desert Flower Dancers.

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  • Caletas Bay and Corcovado National Park

    I love my country. I love its people and food and more than anything else, its natural resources. After 29 years as a guide for Central America, especially Costa Rica and Panama, traveling widely around the world with the work I do (I am also a tropical biologist), the Osa Peninsula is my uncontested favorite. Not a single time in my life have I come here and not be wowed by its lush forest, green waters, blue mountains and unmatched biodiversity.

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  • Genovesa Island

    Tower, or Genovesa, is home to over one million seabirds. Our highlights here were diverse, from Nazca, red & blue-footed boobies and gulls to owls, fur seals, hammerhead sharks, turtles and manta rays.Our adventure began with a wet landing on a white coralline beach inside Darwin Bay, named by a celebrity visitor, William Beebe, in honor of the great naturalist who re-directed human thought, Charles Darwin. At low tide and over a platform, we walked surrounded by birds of all kinds, their chicks, behavior, and colors. We were first moved by so much seabird activity – parents taking care of juveniles, hoping one day they can fend for themselves. Naturalists were also very excited that our guests were able to see many male great firgatebirds and red-footed boobies in this northern hemisphere island which has a very different ecology than any other. When we reached our hike’s turning point, we were surprised by the low tidal access to a larger platform.

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  • Salisbury Plain, South Georgia

    What a fantastic way to start our exploration of the remote island of South Georgia! We found some shelter from the swell and landed in Salisbury Plains to hike to the second largest king penguin colony in the island with well over 100,000 birds present. From little chicks being fed by their parents to adults that had finished molting and were getting ready to go back to sea, we got to witness a range of milestones in the rather long breeding cycle of these penguins.

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Please note: Daily Expedition Reports (DER’s) are posted Monday-Friday only, during normal business hours.


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