The Falkland Islands

Mar 22, 2018 - National Geographic Explorer


This morning we awoke to the relative calm and silence of the outer harbor at Port Stanley, Falklands. After a long journey across the increasingly turbulent and gusty Southern Ocean, the sight of dry land was very welcome. However, with gusts of wind up to 60 miles an hour forcing the port authorities to shut the port, we put our planned morning activities on hold, and remained anchored in the outer harbor.

Instead, we were treated to a couple of impromptu talks from our naturalists. First up was naturalist, and 2018 Bird of the Year ambassador, Santiago Imberti, who talked about his work in Patagonia to protect the critically endangered hooded grebe. Just before lunch naturalist Jimmy White spoke to us about connectivity, tagging, and tracking of animals in the marine environment.

After lunch, and a presentation by National Geographic photographer, Jay Dickman, we repositioned into the inner harbor where we could begin disembarkation, via a local launch. Once ashore, we had the chance to stretch our legs, visit the Falklands Conservation center, and even mingle with the locals at one of Stanley’s pubs.

We returned to the ship for Captain Aaron Wood’s farewell dinner, to reflect on what has been an epic voyage, where we have encountered the true nature of the wildlife and weather of the Falklands and South Georgia.

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About the Author

Rory Mulloy

Naturalist/Expedition Diver

Rory’s underwater experiences began while working on a citizen science project in Tobago, conducting surveys of coral reefs with Coral Cay Conservation. After completing a degree in foreign languages, and returning to his hometown London, it wasn’t long before Rory felt the lure of the ocean. Thanks to serendipitous circumstances (and some words from President JFK) he soon quit office life to pursue his dream job of working with great white sharks in Australia.

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