Fernandina and Isabela Islands

Jul 09, 2018 - National Geographic Endeavour II


The western islands of the Galápagos Archipelago are formidable, being also the most remote. The elegant, majestic outlines of Fernandina and Isabela’s shield volcanoes stand tall around Canal Bolivar, which divides both islands. In the past few weeks, both islands have been erupting brand new red-hot lavas, adding to the already inhospitable environment few species have been able to colonize. Bearing the brunt of the cold Cromwell Undercurrent, the waters surrounding this area are very cold, allowing for the increased productivity that supports countless endemic marine iguanas and sea turtles.

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About the Author

Gaby Bohorquez

Naturalist

Gaby was born and raised in Guayaquil, Ecuador. Her first job in the Galapagos was on board a 90-passenger cruise ship as the cruise director’s assistant, and she fell under the spell of the Enchanted Isles. She returned to Guayaquil to study at the Espiritu Santo Technological University to obtain a degree in Tourism Management. Her fascination for the islands was still strong so, after finishing her studies, Gaby took the opportunity to join the Naturalist Guide’s course, jointly organized by the Galapagos National Park Service and the Charles Darwin Research Station. That was back in 1992, and she has been a naturalist since, keeping her deep love and passion for the islands during all these years.

About the Videographer

David Barnes

Expedition Leader

David studied history at the University of York in England and theology at the University of Wales.  Research in the field of religious history (at Cardiff) followed on naturally.  He has spent most of his professional life teaching history, most recently in adult education departments within the University of Wales where he has taught a wide variety of courses pertinent to the wider Atlantic world.  In 1988, he made his first lecture-tour of the U.S. for the English Speaking Union. He has published extensively on Welsh history and topography–his most recent book being the Companion Guide to Wales (2005)–and is a frequent contributor of articles and reviews to Welsh cultural and literary journals.  In the1990s, David was active in the field of international education, traveling worldwide and spending a year in the U.S. (in Atlanta and New York City).  He speaks English and French in addition to his native Welsh.

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