Sombrero Chino & Sullivan Bay

Dec 06, 2019 - National Geographic Islander


Today we woke up close to a channel with crystal clear water and black lava fields surrounding us. We explored the channel with water activities, first with a kayak and a Zodiac ride outing and then we jumped in the water for some magical snorkeling.

In the afternoon, we went around Santiago Island, and landed at Sullivan Bay. This very young lava flow occurred just 120 years ago, even Darwin missed it when he visited the Galapagos in 1835. The night ended with a delicious barbecue dinner on the sky deck, laughs, and shared memories among crew and guests of National Geographic Islander!

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About the Author

Gianna Haro

Naturalist

Most of Gianna´s memories seem to be dreams, made on flawless white sandy beaches with black lava rock contours and gorgeous turquoise ocean waters. Most of it happened while barefoot, in an enchanting place that some people regard as an ideal natural laboratory, the Galápagos Islands. For her it was home. Gianna grew up going to the beach nearly every day, snorkeling in crystal clear waters, playing with wild flowers, having sea lions steal her ice cream, observing marine iguanas, and identifying invertebrates. The latter was by no means technically accurate—she dubbed each new discovery with its own made-up scientific name. At some point during those early years, being an observer became an innate ability and she knew she wanted to be a biologist. 

About the Photographer

Cindy Manning

Expedition Leader

Born in Lima, Peru, of North American parents, Cindy and her family subsequently lived in several South American and European countries with a couple stops in Peoria, Illinois. Cindy received a degree in biology from Earlham College in Richmond, Indiana. Afterwards, Cindy spent a year and a half teaching science in the Western Province of Kenya, East Africa. 

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