Daily Expedition Reports

Browse photos & daily reports sent from the field every day

Lastest Expedition Reports

  • Cienfuegos, Cuba

    The DER below is from the expedition to Cuba that began on February 8, 2017.Our last full day in the mesmerizing country of Cuba was spent exploring Cienfuegos, a French Colonial town named after General Cienfuegos – the town’s name does not mean 100 fires!  In the morning we explored the Plaza Marti and a state owned farmers market, followed by a visit to the Benny More School of Art. Read More

    • Feb 17, 2017
    • Panorama II in Cuba
  • South Plaza and Santa Fe Island

    After breakfast, we had a dry landing on a flat uplifted island known as South Plaza. This visitor site looked very colorful from the beginning; red succulent plants, a forest of prickly pear cacti and when you looked carefully, you could see several land iguanas camouflaged under the shade of the cacti, either resting or feasting on pieces of the succulent cactus. The cliffs were full of Galapagos shearwaters, swallow tailed gulls and a few of the red billed tropic birds trying to make it into their nesting grottos. Read More

    • Feb 16, 2017
    • National Geographic Islander in Galápagos
  • Bartolome and Sombrero Chino Island

    Today we visited the island of Bartolome. A great early hike to the summit of the island, a good exercise for body and soul, before a delicious breakfast, after the hike we visited the golden sandy beach where we had time for swimming and snorkeling! In the afternoon we all enjoyed a great Zodiac ride at Sombrero Chino and an incredible snorkeling with lots of colorful fish, rays, reef sharks and Galapagos penguins.. Read More

    • Feb 16, 2017
    • National Geographic Endeavour II in Galápagos
  • Cayo Largo, Cuba

    The DER below is from the expedition to Cuba that began on February 8, 2017 Today we spent most of the day visiting the second largest island of the Canarreos archipelago, Cayo Largo; meaning "long key" in Spanish, Cayo Largo is a 26 km-long and narrow island that is a visitor's paradise with its beautiful beaches of white sand and mangrove forests. Read More

    • Feb 16, 2017
    • Panorama in Cuba
  • Santa Cruz Island, Eden Islet and Daphne Major Island

    Today the National Geographic Endeavour II, explores the northern shores of Santa Cruz Island. This is the second largest island in the archipelago and most inhabited, this morning we have the opportunity to see the national park visitor site know as “Cerro Dragon” or Dragon Hill, here we will be looking for the unique yellow land iguana endemic to the Galapagos. In the afternoon the National Geographic Endeavour II repositions to the north western side of Santa Cruz and anchors in front of a very dramatically eroded tuff cone known as “Eden Islet”, a natural habitat for blue-footed boobies, frigate birds, herons, sea lions and iguanas. We offer a kayaking outing and a coastal exploration via zodiac. With the spectacular sunset the National Geographic Endeavour II circumnavigates Daphne Major Island and our guests meet us at the sky deck to learn about the history of this site while they enjoy several wines from South America.. Read More

    • Feb 15, 2017
    • National Geographic Endeavour II in Galápagos
  • At Sea, Drake Passage

    Once again the Drake Passage was being kind to the National Geographic Explorer and its gallant crew. Although not as calm as our southward journey, it was still quite benign compared to what conditions can be like when crossing this notorious body of water. I wrote this at 17:35 local time and very soon we would be crossing the 60th parallel, leaving Antarctica. Read More

    • Feb 15, 2017
    • National Geographic Explorer in Antarctica
  • Santa Cruz Island

    We navigated north overnight and dropped anchor just before dawn in Academy Bay. The bustling town of Puerto Ayora was spread along the coast and we could see farms in the highlands. This island is home for over 20,000 inhabitants and also boasts the headquarters of the Galapagos National Park Service and the Charles Darwin Research Station. Tourism, agriculture and fishing provide jobs for most of the people who live in one of the three towns on Santa Cruz. We spent a couple hours this morning visiting the Research Station and learning about the successful captive breeding of giant tortoises. Read More

    • Feb 15, 2017
    • National Geographic Islander in Galápagos
  • Isla de la Juventud, Cuba

    The DER below is from the expedition to Cuba that began on February 8, 2017.   Today we were at Isla de la Juventud (Isle of Youth) off the southwestern coast of Cuba. Read More

    • Feb 15, 2017
    • Panorama in Cuba
  • At Sea, Magdalena Bay and Hull Canal

    Long Pacific Ocean swells woke us and soon we were in sight of Isla Santa Margarita, the mountainous southern boundary island that encloses part of the great expanse of Bahia Magdalena.  Once near La Entrada, the puffy blows and pale gray backs of California gray whales began to appear in ones, twos and occasionally threes. We often think of the waters near the entrance as the singles bar, as mostly adult whales ready to reproduce come into this area. After Octavio talked about the whales of Baja California, our local pilots came aboard and we continued northbound toward the nursery region of the bay.The channel narrows and becomes shallow and lined by mangroves, those fascinating highly adapted plants that guard our coastlines, provide habitat for birds and juvenile fish, create land, and thrive with their roots in salt water. Read More

  • The Commonwealth of Dominica

    Having docked in Prince Rupert Bay last night we had but a few hundred meters to reach our dock and were there by 6:45 a.m. Dominica remains little visited and the Dominicans are a relaxed people. Dominica is the youngest geologically of the Antilles with active volcanoes. The sea off the southwest at Scott’s Head is more than 6000 feet deep. The islands Atlantic coast is rugged and windswept and rising in the middle of the country is the great backbone of mountains which rise to 4775 feet atop Morne Diabolotin. The deep hued lush green of Dominica, unlike so many of the other Antilles, is caused by the collision of the moisture laden clouds carried by the western winds against the mountains. Read More

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